foveola

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foveola

 [fo-ve´o-lah] (pl. fove´olae) (L.)
a minute pit or depression.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

fo·ve·o·la

, pl.

fo·ve·o·lae

(fō-vē'ō-lă, -lē), [TA] Avoid the mispronunciation foveo'la. Do not confuse this word with faveolus.
A minute fovea or pit.
[Mod. L. dim. of L. fovea, pit]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

foveola

(fō-vē′ə-lə)
n. pl. foveo·lae (-lē′) or foveo·las
A small fovea.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

fo·ve·o·la

, pl. foveolae (fō-vē'ō-lă, -ē) [TA]
A minute fovea or pit.
[Mod. L. dim. of L. fovea, pit]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

foveola

The base of the fovea centralis with a diameter of about 0.35 mm (or about 1º of the visual field). The image of the point of fixation is formed on the foveola in the normal eye. The foveola contains cone cells only (rod-free area). The foveal avascular zone is slightly larger (about 0.5 mm in diameter) (Fig. F9). Syn. fovea (term often used by clinicians). See eccentricity; fixation; umbo.
Fig. F9 Cross-section of the retina showing the fovea centralis and foveola (rod-free area)enlarge picture
Fig. F9  Cross-section of the retina showing the fovea centralis and foveola (rod-free area)
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann
References in periodicals archive ?
Kato et al., "Enlargement of foveal avascular zone in diabetic eyes evaluated by en face optical coherence tomography angiography," Retina, vol.
Cooper et al., "Relationship between the foveal avascular zone and foveal pit morphology," Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science, vol.
Caption: Figure 3: Images of [beta]-peripapillary atrophy in a fundus colour paragraph (a, d, e), foveal avascular zone and vessel images of the superficial retinal plexus (b), deep retinal plexus (c), and radial peripapillary capillaries (f) using optical coherence tomography angiography in areas of 3.0 x 3.0 [mm.sup.2] and 4.5 x 4.5 [mm.sup.2].
The exact location of the foveal avascular zone can be determined by fluorescence angiography.
(18) Clinical features include enlarged foveal avascular zone, which is normally 300-500 microns and this is indicated by the presence of increased capillary dropouts on FFA.
Braganza, "Dimensions of the foveal avascular zone using the Heidelberg retinal angiogram-2 in normal eyes," Indian Journal of Ophthalmology, vol.
Khoo et al., "Correlation of foveal avascular zone size with foveal morphology in normal eyes using optical coherence tomography angiography," Retina, vol.
In diabetic patients without diabetic retinopathy, some studies have put forward a theory concerning infraclinical microvascular changes: the asymmetry and enlargement on the foveal avascular zone (FAZ) area [15, 16, 23, 24] and the presence of capillary nonperfusion areas adjacent to the FAZ [16,25].
No difference was noticed either when looking for irregular outlines and punched out borders of the foveal avascular zone (FAZ), as well as nonperfusion areas or morphological capillary network abnormalities (i.e., dilated capillaries, capillary loops, and blind-end capillaries).
Hard exudates with retinal thickening 500pm or less from center of foveal avascular zone.
Swept-source optical coherence tomography angiography (SS-OCT-A) imaging of the right fundus (Triton, Topcon) (Figure 2) demonstrated the aberrant vessel encroaching into the foveal avascular zone (FAZ) but not passing through the center of the fovea.
(10) Foveal hypoplasia is usually present and manifests as reduced foveal reflex, macular hypo pigmentation and crossing of the usual foveal avascular zone by retinal vessels.