adulterant

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a·dul·ter·ant

(ă-dŭl'tĕr-ănt),
An impurity; an additive that is considered to have an undesirable effect or to dilute the active material so as to reduce its therapeutic or monetary value.

a·dul·ter·ant

(ă-dŭl'tĕr-ănt)
An impurity; an additive that is considered to have an undesirable effect or to dilute the active material so as to reduce its therapeutic or monetary value.

a·dul·ter·ant

(ă-dŭl'tĕr-ănt)
An impurity; an additive that is considered to have an undesirable effect or to dilute the active material so as to reduce its therapeutic value.
References in periodicals archive ?
Inadequate enforcement of food laws and food safety measures also lead to food adulteration. This has not only aggravated the situation but is also devastating the lives of our innocent and poor people.
The basic measures that can be taken by citizens to possibly reduce or even eliminate the curse of food adulteration are:
There is a second factor in food adulteration and contamination in India.
Neither of these positions lands her squarely in debates over effective remedies to rampant food adulteration. Should the responsibility for oversight rest with the consumer?
plants are inspected and whether USDA and FDA have sufficient power to respond to food adulteration.
A council spokeswoman added that a special group of Indian government ministers has submitted a report on possible changes to the Prevention of Food Adulteration Act, which would take account of pesticide contamination in drinks.
Genetic engineering is a new kind of food adulteration that takes place at the genetic level and is hence invisible.
The program offers coverage for liquor liability, host liquor, food spoilage, food adulteration, boiler and machinery, valet parking, coat check, liability, pollution clean up, business income, sales samples, general liability, transit crime, and umbrella.
Whilst food adulteration is not common today, the food industry needs to be aware of the possibilities and have procedures in place to deal with it.
Gann added: "Food adulteration has become more sophisticated and harder to detect.
The board chose to prosecute swill milk sellers rather than stable owners; to lay the burden for food adulteration on retail butchers, grocers, and druggists rather than on wholesalers or manufacturers; and to concentrate heavily on a few products and to ignore many others also subject to extensive adulteration.