biosimilar

(redirected from Follow-on Biologics)
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biosimilar

(bī′ō-sĭm′ə-lər)
adj.
Highly similar in function and effect to an existing biological product, especially to a biologic that has already been clinically tested and approved for use.
n.
A biological product that is biosimilar to an existing product, especially to a biologic.

biosimilar

adjective Referring to a biosimilar therapeutics agent.
 
noun A biopharmaceutical which is produced by a different manufacturer after the expiration of the patent and marketing exclusivity of an original innovative biological product (e.g., a therapeutic monoclonal antibody).
 
In contrast to small (non-biological) agents, for which manufacturing an equivalent product is a relatively straightforward chemical process, biosimilars are not produced from the original clones and cell lines used to produce the tested and proven-effective agent; they thus may have therapeutic and metabolic profiles that differ from the clinically tested and proven products.

biosimilar

(bi?o-sim'i-lar) [ bio- + similar]
1. A generic version of a biologically active pharmaceutical agent, e.g., of a manufactured antibody or hormone.
2. Pert. to such a generic version.
Synonym: follow-on biologicbiosimilarity
References in periodicals archive ?
The workshop will focus on how state regulations and so-called naming conventions may impact the development of, and competition for, follow-on biologics.
Baxter will make an upfront cash payment of $33 million to Momenta related to the collaboration for as many as six follow-on biologic compounds.
Because Big Pharma has unique advantages compared with generic companies regarding the ability to successfully compete in the follow-on biologics arena, namely existing manufacturing capabilities, funding, experience with clinical trials and physician detailing, it makes sense that Big Pharma companies would consider the opportunity.
However, even if legislation enabling a follow-on biologics pathway had passed, it would take several years before practicing physicians had the opportunity to prescribe the generics, noted Dr.
During that time, the agency has worked to sort out scientific issues relating to follow-on biologics, and a historical white paper and guidance documents on the subject are under development.
Insmed's follow-on biologics portfolio includes INS-19, an investigational recombinant granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) in Phase III trials for the prevention of infections in cancer patients receiving chemotherapy, and INS-20, a pegylated recombinant G-CSF designed to allow for less frequent dosing, that is currently in Phase I trials.
The draft guidance is also expected to address the extent to which applications for follow-on biologics can reference studies conducted by the manufacturer of the source biologic.