taxonomy

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taxonomy

 [tak-son´ah-me]
the orderly classification of organisms or lists into appropriate categories (taxa), with application of suitable and correct names. adj., adj taxonom´ic.
numerical taxonomy a method of classifying organisms solely on the basis of the number of shared phenotypic characters, each character usually being given equal weight; used primarily in bacteriology.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

tax·on·o·my

(taks-on'ŏ-mē),
The systematic classification of living things or organisms. Kingdoms of living organisms are divided into groups (taxa) to show degrees of similarity or presumed evolutionary relationships, with the higher categories being larger, more inclusive, and more broadly defined, and the lower categories being more restricted, with fewer species more closely related. The divisions below kingdom are, in descending order: phylum, class, order, family, genus, species, and subspecies (variety). Infra- and supra- or sub- and super- categories can be used when needed; additional categories, such as tribe, section, level, group, etc., are also used.
[G. taxis, orderly arrangement, + nomos, law]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

taxonomy

(tăk-sŏn′ə-mē)
n. pl. taxono·mies
1. The classification and naming of organisms in an ordered system that is intended to indicate natural relationships, especially evolutionary relationships.
2. The science, laws, or principles of classification.
3. An ordered arrangement of groups or categories: a taxonomy of literary genres.

tax·on′o·mist n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

tax·on·o·my

(taks-on'ŏ-mē)
The systematic classification of living things or organisms. Kingdoms of living organisms are divided into groups (taxa) to show degrees of similarity or presumed evolutionary relationships, with the higher categories larger, more inclusive, and more broadly defined; the lower categories more restricted, with fewer species, and more closely related. The divisions below kingdom are, in descending order: phylum, class, order, family, genus, species, and subspecies (variety). Infra-, supra-, sub-, and super categories can be used when needed; additional categories, such as tribe, section, level, and group, are also used.
[G. taxis, orderly arrangement, + nomos, law]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

taxonomy

The science or principles of biological classification and the assignment of appropriate names to species.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

taxonomy

the study of the CLASSIFICATION of organisms. Classical taxonomy involves the use of morphological features, cytotaxonomy the use of somatic chromosomes, experimental taxonomy involves the determining of genetical interrelationships, and numerical taxonomy involves quantitative assessments of similarities and differences in an attempt to make objective assessments.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

tax·on·o·my

(taks-on'ŏ-mē)
The systematic classification of living things or organisms. Kingdoms of living organisms are divided into groups (taxa) to show degrees of similarity or presumed evolutionary relationships, with the higher categories larger, more inclusive, and more broadly defined; the lower categories more restricted, with fewer species, and more closely related. The divisions below kingdom are, in descending order: phylum, class, order, family, genus, species, and subspecies (variety).
[G. taxis, orderly arrangement, + nomos, law]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Since FolkRank computes a ranking on all three dimensions of the folksonomy, this produces the most relevant tags, users, and items for the given users (or items).
As defined by Wikipedia, "Folksonomy is a collaboratively generated, open-ended labeling system that enables Internet users to categorize content such as Web pages, online photographs, and Web links." The article continues by explaining that "the freely chosen labels, called tags, help to improve search engine's effectiveness because content is categorized using a familiar, accessible, and shared vocabulary" ("Folksonomy").
During the learning stages, students are guided according to a learning guidance tree, which is derived from a folksonomy. The overview of the folksonomy transformation process is illustrated in Figure 1.
Angeletou, "Semantic enrichment of folksonomy tagspaces," in The Semantic Web--ISWC 2008, A.
Web 1.0 Web 2.0 Doubleclick Google AdSense Ofoto Flickr Akamai BitTorrent Britannica Online Wikipedia Personal websites Blogging Domain name speculation Search engine optimization Page views Cost per click Screen scraping Web services Content management systems Wikis Directories (taxonomy) Tagging ("folksonomy") Fuente: O'Reilly, Tim.
Due to their potential as a form of social tagging--or "folksonomy" (Vander Wal 2007) (1)--and as a tool that facilitates the spread of information, Twitter hashtags have been the subject of several scholarly investigations.