taxonomy

(redirected from Folksonomy)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

taxonomy

 [tak-son´ah-me]
the orderly classification of organisms or lists into appropriate categories (taxa), with application of suitable and correct names. adj., adj taxonom´ic.
numerical taxonomy a method of classifying organisms solely on the basis of the number of shared phenotypic characters, each character usually being given equal weight; used primarily in bacteriology.

tax·on·o·my

(taks-on'ŏ-mē),
The systematic classification of living things or organisms. Kingdoms of living organisms are divided into groups (taxa) to show degrees of similarity or presumed evolutionary relationships, with the higher categories being larger, more inclusive, and more broadly defined, and the lower categories being more restricted, with fewer species more closely related. The divisions below kingdom are, in descending order: phylum, class, order, family, genus, species, and subspecies (variety). Infra- and supra- or sub- and super- categories can be used when needed; additional categories, such as tribe, section, level, group, etc., are also used.
[G. taxis, orderly arrangement, + nomos, law]

taxonomy

/tax·on·o·my/ (tak-son´ah-me) the orderly classification of organisms into appropriate categories (taxa), with application of suitable and correct names.taxonom´ic
numerical taxonomy  a method of classifying organisms solely on the basis of the number of shared phenotypic characters, each character usually being given equal weight; used primarily in bacteriology.

taxonomy

(tăk-sŏn′ə-mē)
n. pl. taxono·mies
1. The classification and naming of organisms in an ordered system that is intended to indicate natural relationships, especially evolutionary relationships.
2. The science, laws, or principles of classification.
3. An ordered arrangement of groups or categories: a taxonomy of literary genres.

tax·on′o·mist n.

taxonomy

[takson′əmē]
Etymology: Gk, taxis, arrangement, nomos, rule
a system for classifying organisms according to their natural relationships on the basis of such common factors as embryology, structure, or physiological chemistry. The system has seven main levels, or taxa, each more comprehensive than those below it: kingdom, phylum (or division), class, order, family, genus, and species. Humans are members of the species Homo sapiens, of the genus Homo, in the family Hominidae in the order Primates, in the class Mammalia, in the phylum Chordata, in the kingdom Animalia. taxonomic, adj.

tax·on·o·my

(taks-on'ŏ-mē)
The systematic classification of living things or organisms. Kingdoms of living organisms are divided into groups (taxa) to show degrees of similarity or presumed evolutionary relationships, with the higher categories larger, more inclusive, and more broadly defined; the lower categories more restricted, with fewer species, and more closely related. The divisions below kingdom are, in descending order: phylum, class, order, family, genus, species, and subspecies (variety). Infra-, supra-, sub-, and super categories can be used when needed; additional categories, such as tribe, section, level, and group, are also used.
[G. taxis, orderly arrangement, + nomos, law]

taxonomy

The science or principles of biological classification and the assignment of appropriate names to species.

taxonomy

the study of the CLASSIFICATION of organisms. Classical taxonomy involves the use of morphological features, cytotaxonomy the use of somatic chromosomes, experimental taxonomy involves the determining of genetical interrelationships, and numerical taxonomy involves quantitative assessments of similarities and differences in an attempt to make objective assessments.

taxonomy

classification by categorization into specific and logical groups, e.g. classification of living organisms to show similarity/evolutionary relationships, in descending order: phylum, class, order, family, genus, species, subspecies, variety

taxonomy (ta·ksôˑ·n·mē),

n 1., any specialized method of classifying objects or events.
2., scientific system used to classify living organisms.

tax·on·o·my

(taks-on'ŏ-mē)
The systematic classification of living things or organisms. Kingdoms of living organisms are divided into groups (taxa) to show degrees of similarity or presumed evolutionary relationships, with the higher categories larger, more inclusive, and more broadly defined; the lower categories more restricted, with fewer species, and more closely related. The divisions below kingdom are, in descending order: phylum, class, order, family, genus, species, and subspecies (variety).
[G. taxis, orderly arrangement, + nomos, law]

taxonomy (takson´əmē),

n a system for classifying organisms on the basis of natural relationships and assigning them appropriate names.

taxonomy

the orderly classification of organisms into appropriate categories (taxa), with application of suitable and correct names.

numerical taxonomy
a method of classifying organisms solely on the basis of the number of shared phenotypic characters, each character usually being given equal weight; used primarily in bacteriology.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tagging, Folksonomy & Co--Renaissance of Manual Indexing?
It is not a case of a folksonomy replacing a taxonomy.
De acuerdo con Smith (2004), la folksonomia, del termino ingles folksonomy, es un neologismo que da nombre a la categorizacion colaborativa por medio de etiquetas simples o tags en un espacio de nombres llano, sin jerarquias ni relaciones de parentesco predeterminadas.
The folksonomy of Wikipedia, as well as its encyclopedic articles are dynamic and, thus, in constant evolution.
Thomas Vander Wal coined the word folksonomy in 2004 to describe the "the result of personal free tagging of information and objects (anything with a URL) for one's own retrieval" (2007), as compared with uncontrolled keyword indexing in early databases, where the intention was to promote retrieval by others.
Figure 6 shows the folksonomy of topics for the channel Future of Journalism.
The growing interest in folksonomy research among library scientists, information scientists, and computer scientists is a positive sign--but only a sign--that this deficiency is potentially reversible.
Legg: Integrating Cyc and Wikipedia: Folksonomy meets rigorously defined common-sense, in: Proceedings of Wiki-AI Workshop at the AAAI'08 Conference, Chicago, US, 2008.
Dbpedia, which provides that basis for CAF-SIAL, is built around a controlled vocabulary (an ontology, actually), whereas freebase adopts the folksonomy approach in which people can add new categories much like tags [O'Reilly 2007].
More emphasis is given to folksonomy than taxonomy.
With computers, you can adjust for the patterns, so if you notice how things group in the real world (or even in the virtual world), then you can have human-made ontologies, both the very specific and the folksonomy types, and then you can have the patterns that the computer sees, so a human can decide whether the patterns are real or not.
A good example of the wisdom of crowds is the notion of folksonomy, or tagging, defined by Wikipedia as "a collaboratively generated, open-ended labeling system that enables Internet users to categorize content" (6).