focus

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focus

 [fo´kus] (pl. fo´ci) (L.)
1. the point of convergence of light rays or sound waves.
2. the chief center of a morbid process.
Ghon focus the primary parenchymal lesion of primary pulmonary tuberculosis in children; when associated with a corresponding lymph node focus, it is known as the primary or Ghon complex. Called also Ghon tubercle.
grid focus in radiology, a determination made by drawing an imaginary line from the outside of the width of the grid to where it intersects with a centering point. Called also grid radius.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

fo·cus

, pl.

fo·ci

(fō'kŭs, fō'sī), Avoid the mispronunciation fō'kī of the plural of this word.
1. The point at which the light rays meet after passing through a convex lens.
2. The center, or the starting point, of a disease process.
[L. a hearth]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

focus

(fō′kəs)
n.
1. A point at which rays of light or other radiation converge or from which they appear to diverge, as after refraction or reflection in an optical system.
2. See focal length.
3. The distinctness or clarity of an image rendered by an optical system.
4. The state of maximum distinctness or clarity of such an image.
5. The region of a localized bodily infection or disease.
v.
1. To cause light rays or other radiation to converge on or toward a central point; concentrate.
2. To render an object or image in clear outline or sharp detail by adjustment of one's vision or an optical device.
3. To adjust a lens or instrument to produce a clear image.
4. To converge on or toward a central point of focus; be focused.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

focus

A center, often of a disseminated disease–ie, cancer, infection
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

fo·cus

(F), pl. foci (fō'kŭs, -sī)
1. The point at which the light rays meet after passing through a convex lens.
2. The center, or the starting point, of a disease process.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

focus

or

primary focus

an area containing a high concentration of diseased plants or animals and from which the disease probably spreads.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

focus

1. The point at which rays of light converge after passing through a convex lens to form a real image (real focus), or diverge from (virtual focus) after passing through a concave lens. 2. The centre or starting point of a disease process. 3. To adjust an optical system (e.g. camera or projector) in order to obtain a sharp image. Plural: foci. Syn. focusing. See confocal; principal focus; focal line.
aplanatic foci A pair of conjugate object and image points for which an optical system is free of spherical aberration. Syn. aplanatic points.
dark focus See resting state of accommodation.
depth of focus See depth of focus.
principal focus The axial image point produced by an optical system of an infinitely distant object (the second principal focus or posterior principal focus), or that axial object point for which the image will be formed at infinity (the first principal focus or anterior principal focus). A converging optical system or lens has two principal foci that are real. A diverging optical system or lens has a second principal focus that is virtual. In curved mirrors the two principal foci coincide. Depending upon whether the object is at infinity or at the principal focus, this same focal point becomes either the second principal focus or the first principal focus, respectively. Syn. focal point. See focal length; equivalent power; sign convention.
real focus See focus.
sagittal focus; tangential focus See oblique astigmatism.
virtual focus See focus.
Millodot: Dictionary of Optometry and Visual Science, 7th edition. © 2009 Butterworth-Heinemann

fo·cus

, pl. foci (fō'kŭs, -sī)
1. The point at which the light rays meet after passing through a convex lens.
2. The center, or the starting point, of a disease process.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about focus

Q. My mind is getting confused now and i am losing on my focus. why is this change happening in me? I am a bipolar for the past 1 year. With the help of the medicines my episodes has come down. My mood is good and stable. Even my friends say that I am well as compared to previous years. But since last week I am not able to sleep well. My disrupted and reduced sleep is making me stressed. I just get 2-3 hours of sleep at night. After my lunch my tiredness starts again. My mind is getting confused now and I am losing on my focus. Why is this change happening in me?

A. There are some possibilities that you are not taking your diet in time or your diet may not be nutritious as per your requirements. This can cause you to have increased stress and you can lose your sleep. This may increase the tiredness. Check if you are taking your medicines in right time. This can also be due to your stress. You may have stress due to your lifestyle too, which needs to be well managed in a healthy way. You can meet your doctor, as any increase in stress due to sleep deprivation can raise the chances of episodes to return back.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YdO5m_mfaTQ&eurl=http://www.imedix.com/health_community/vYdO5m%5EmfaTQ_bipolar_disorder_facts?q=bipolar%20disorder&feature=player_embedded

Q. Is there a verity of exercises i can do with my child that would be helpful for him to be more focused and relaxed and by that help him to control the ADHD effects ?

A. from our experience - any activity is a good activity...if he feels hyperactive during homework or studying, going out and running around the block will be enough for him. if he can't do that, doing push ups, situps, and even jumping in one place can help- although i must say it is irritating as hell... try practicing also breathing techniques in order to relax.

More discussions about focus
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References in periodicals archive ?
As Doherty (this issue) shows, also English topicalization requires the focus position to be filled by something focusable. The phenomenon is not restricted to argument structure, but involves adjuncts, too.
The product features a focusable lamp, up to 14 hours of standard usage, an environmentally friendly battery, as well as external programming capability for frequency change and minor maintenance.
Features of which included a BDC calibrated to 800 or 1,200 meters, large objective lens, a focusable ocular lens, and, for the time period, superb light transmission and resolving power.
Its optics proved excellent, with sharp stars across most of the field and a focusable front objective.
While lexical elements, like only, assign focus to constituents in their scope or express inherently focused concepts, like for example superlatives, syntactic structures assign focus in certain grammatical configurations, for example to a verb-adjacent focusable element in the verb phrase (see Jacobs 1988: Rosengren 1991 Abraham 1992; etc.).
Ortek's Type 5157 night vision goggles use two focusable 26.6 mm f/1.4 objective lenses, two Gen 2 intensifier tubes and two adjustable eyepieces.
The combination of focusable and fixed focus LED technology provides quality illumination that is always bright, cool and shadow-free for every procedure.
This lens is focusable from 50 mm to infinity and features a fixed F/8 aperture that allows for a balance between depth of field and resolution while maintaining significant light-gathering power.
* A combination of focusable and fixed focus LED technology providing quality illumination that is bright, cool and shadow-free for every procedure.
In addition, anti-reflection, coated glass optical components (including a new 10x focusable eyepiece) have been developed to improve illumination and shadowline contrast.