sclerotherapy

(redirected from Foam sclerotherapy)
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scle·ro·ther·a·py

(sklē'rō-ther'ă-pē),
Treatment involving the injection of a sclerosing solution into vessels or tissues.
Synonym(s): sclerosing therapy

sclerotherapy

/scle·ro·ther·a·py/ (sklēr″o-ther´ah-pe) injection of a chemical irritant into a vein to produce inflammation and eventual fibrosis and obliteration of the lumen, as for treatment of hemorrhoids.

sclerotherapy

(sklîr′ō-thĕr′ə-pē)
n.
Treatment, as for varicose veins, involving the injection of a sclerosing solution into vessels or tissues.

sclerotherapy

[-ther′əpē]
Etymology: Gk, skleros, hard, therapeia, treatment
the use of sclerosing chemicals to treat varicosities such as hemorrhoids or esophageal varices. The agent produces inflammation and later fibrosis and obliteration of the lumen.
An injection therapy used by some health professionals to treat various types of chronic pain

sclerotherapy

The use of a sclerosing agent to induce fibrous obliteration of pathologic blood vessels–eg, hemorrhoids or esophageal varices. See Endoscopic sclerotherapy, Injection sclerotherapy.

scle·ro·ther·a·py

(sklerō-thāră-pē)
Treatment involving the injection of a sclerosing solution into vessels or tissues; commonly used for pediatric vascular and lymphatic malformations and adult hemorrhoids and varicose veins.

sclerotherapy

A treatment for varicose veins in which the affected veins are injected with a solution that causes inflammation of the vein lining, clotting of the contained blood and closure of the vein.

sclerotherapy (skl·rō·theˑ·r·pē),

n a treatment in which a mildly ir-ritating substance (a proliferant) is injected into osseus-ligamentous junc-tions or into weak connective tissues. The body's response to the irritant includes increased blood flow and tissue strengthening. Also called
reconstructive therapy. See also proliferant.

scle·ro·ther·a·py

(sklerō-thāră-pē)
Treatment involving the injection of a sclerosing solution into vessels or tissues.

sclerotherapy

the injection of sclerosing agents.
References in periodicals archive ?
Our non-surgical medical procedures include Endovenous Laser Treatment and Ultrasound-Guided Foam Sclerotherapy, which is the future of vein care available today at Vein911[R].
In our study, 60% limbs underwent foam sclerotherapy for perforators of all endovenous procedures done for main superficial veins & for main trunks EVLA for 27.
Fluoroscopy-guided endovenous foam sclerotherapy using a microcatheter in varicose tributaries followed by endovenous laser treatment of incompetent saphenous veins: technical feasibility and early results.
This was achieved with conventional surgery in 85% of treated cases, in 77% of legs treated with endovenous laser ablation (EVLA), and in 23% with ultrasound-guided foam sclerotherapy (UGFS).
Earnshaw, "The use of foam sclerotherapy for varicose veins: a survey of the members of the Vascular Society of Great Britain and Ireland," European Journal of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, vol.
In the study, a headache specialist analyzed questionnaires that were completed by 20 consecutive patients who reported visual disturbances after undergoing foam sclerotherapy at 11 French outpatient phlebology clinics.
Newer methods for treating varicose veins such as Endovenous Thermal Ablation (endovenous laser treatment or radiofrequency ablation), and foam sclerotherapy are not as well studied, especially in the longer term.
To date, there is only 1 published prospective, randomized study that directly compares foam sclerotherapy with stripping/ ligation surgery.
2nd European Consensus Meeting on Foam Sclerotherapy, 28-30 April 2006, Tegernsee, Germany.
Open surgical treatment of varicose veins, known as ligation and stripping, is more painful than newer options such as endovenous laser ablation (EVLA), radiofrequency ablation (RFA), and foam sclerotherapy (FS).
This textbook on foam sclerotherapy outlines the effectiveness of this medical development in the treatment of varicose veins, and how its ease of implementation has revolutionized the field of phlebotomy.