foam cells


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foam cells

cells with abundant, pale-staining, finely vacuolated cytoplasm, usually histiocytes that have ingested or accumulated material that dissolves during tissue preparation, especially lipids.
See also: lipophage.

foam cells

(fōm selz)
Cells with abundant, pale-staining, finely vacuolated cytoplasm, usually histiocytes that have ingested or accumulated material that dissolves during tissue preparation, especially lipids.
See also: lipophage
References in periodicals archive ?
1) Although masses of cholesterol, foam cells, and giant cells are often seen as secondary or degenerative findings in many bone lesions, the underlying or "primary" lesion can be radiologically or histologically identified in most cases.
Escherichia coli), can promote macrophage foam cell formation in vitro (8,39).
Hence as the loading increases more kenaf-core particles go to the walls of the foam cells thereby increasing the resistance to deformation and thereby increasing the strength of the foam composite.
This finding suggests a reduction in protein synthesis, that is, a quiescence state which may be analogous to that of proliferation-impaired foam cells.
The scientists found that pomegranate polyphenols accumulated inside of the arterial macrophages (immune cells) that absorb LDL cholesterol, preventing them from oxidizing their LDL burden and keeping them from turning into dangerous foam cells.
It is also observed that at these low resin feed rates the talc has a more pronounced effect on the foam cell diameter than the water content in the feed.
5-1 [micro]m in diameter were found in aPLA foam cell walls.
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego, showed that when a buildup of reactive molecules in the body causes low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) to undergo a chemical transformation known as oxidation, macrophages -- cells that help LDLs unload their cholesterol -- change into foam cells (SN: 4/30/88, p.
The foaming temperature governs the rate of nucleation of foam cells in a foaming process (14).
Low-density lipoproteins (LDLs)--the so-called "bad" lipoproteins--can foster this by providing the lipids (fats) that swell and transform macrophages, cells that scavenge unwanted materials from the body, into these foam cells.
As discussed previously, since the content of salt interconnecting the foam cells was maintained the same for all samples, it is expected that the open-porosity of the foams would be approximately the same.