fluoroscopy

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Related to Fluoroscopic procedure: Flouroscope

fluoroscopy

 [floo͡″ros´kah-pe]
examination by means of the fluoroscope.

fluor·os·co·py

(flōr-os'kŏ-pē),
Examination of the tissues and deep structures of the body by x-ray, using the fluoroscope or its successor, video fluoroscopy (q.v.).

fluoroscopy

(flo͝o-rŏs′kə-pē, flô-, flō-)
n. pl. fluorosco·pies
Examination by means of a fluoroscope.

fluo·ros′co·pist n.

fluoroscopy

Imaging An x-ray imaging technique used to evaluate moving pulmonary and cardiac structures, and help in needle localization of masses being biopsied Cons Fluoroscopy exposed Pts to more radiation than a standard film; small lesions can be overlooked, there is no permanent record. Cf Computed tomography.

fluor·os·co·py

(flōr-os'kŏ-pē)
Examination of the tissues and deep structures of the body by x-ray, using a fluoroscope.

Fluoroscopic (fluoroscopy)

An x-ray procedure that produces immediate images and motion on a screen. The images look like those seen at airport baggage security stations.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some common diagnostic and interventional fluoroscopic procedures are described below.
These fluoroscopic procedures are becoming less common, however, as magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has virtually replaced fluoroscopic joint imaging.
Recent increases in the use of interventional fluoroscopic procedures have raised concern about deterministic effects, primarily skin damage and hair loss.
From about 1960 to 1990, so few reports of radiation injury in diagnostic radiology occurred that the profession in effect "let down its guard." Their, in the 1990s, the increasing frequency of fluoroscopic procedures brought increasing reports of injury from lengthy, high-dose interventional procedures.
(1,28) Facilities and physicians performing interventional fluoroscopic procedures should monitor delivered patient doses and identify in the medical record those areas of the patient's skin that received an absorbed dose that may approach or exceed the selected threshold.
The study authors suggested that continuous fluoroscopy should be used only rarely for abdominal and pelvic fluoroscopic procedures. (31)
In fact, one study found that continuous dose monitoring during examination led to a reduction in dose and that most radiologists would check the dose-area product meter on the equipment after fluoroscopic procedures when aware that their department was continuously monitoring dose readings of every case.
All personnel involved in fluoroscopic procedures should wear appropriate protective garments.
Radiation safety during fluoroscopic procedures depends on an extensive network of people working together as a team, said Greg Morrison, MA, RT (R), American Society of Radiologic Technologist (ASRT) representative to Image Wisely.
Avoiding radiation injuries from interventional fluoroscopic procedures. Eur Radiol Supplements.
Between 1992 and 1993, the CDRH received reports of patients presenting with skin injuries that may have resulted from prolonged fluoroscopic procedures. On September 20, 1994, the FDA issued a nationwide public health advisory, Avoidance of Serious Skin Injuries to Patients During Fluoroscopically-Guided Procedures.
This has placed the radiologic technologist in the position of being the on-site expert, with technologists assuming an additional responsibility for ensuring that the fluoroscopic procedures are performed in a safe manner.