fluorescence

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fluorescence

 [floo͡-res´ens]
the property of emitting light while exposed to light, the wavelength of the emitted light being longer than that of the absorbed light.
fluorescence microscopy the use of a fluorescence microscope to identify microorganisms or specific tissue constituents that have been stained with a fluorochrome or a fluorochrome-labeled substance (such as an antibody to a tissue antigen). A fluorescent antibody test can be used in place of time-consuming culture methods for identifying bacteria. See also immunofluorescence.

fluor·es·cence

(flōr-es'ents),
Emission of a longer wavelength radiation by a substance as a consequence of absorption of energy from a shorter wavelength radiation, continuing only as long as the stimulus is present; distinguished from phosphorescence, in which emission persists for a perceptible period of time after the stimulus has been removed. See: photoelectric effect.
[fluorspar + -escence, inchoative suffix]

fluorescence

(flo͝o-rĕs′əns, flô-, flō-)
n.
1. The emission of electromagnetic radiation, especially of visible light, stimulated in a substance by the absorption of incident radiation and persisting only as long as the stimulating radiation is continued.
2. The property of emitting such radiation.
3. The radiation so emitted.

fluor·es·cence

(flōr-es'ĕns)
Emission of a longer wavelength radiation by a substance as a consequence of absorption of energy from a shorter wavelength radiation, continuing only as long as the stimulus is present; distinguished from phosphorescence in that, in the latter, emission persists for a perceptible period of time after the stimulus has been removed.
[fluorspar + -escence, formative suffix]

fluorescence

Emission of electromagnetic radiation, especially coloured visible light, during the period of absorption of radiation, which is often of a different frequency from the emitted radiation. Some substances, for instance, fluoresce visibly under ambient invisible ultraviolet light.

fluorescence

the property of giving out light when molecules are excited by incident light. Emitted light is always of a shorter wavelength than the incident light.

fluorescence

Property of a substance that, when illuminated absorbs light of a given wavelength and re-emits it as radiations of a longer wavelength. Example: fluorescein. See Draper's law; Wood's light; lumi-nescence.

fluor·es·cence

(flōr-es'ĕns)
Emission of a longer wavelength radiation by a substance due to absorption of energy from a shorter wavelength radiation, continuing only as long as stimulus present.
[fluorspar + -escence, formative suffix]
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Sweet, perfume and vinegar aromas increased in vitamin A oil premixes exposed to fluorescent light for more than eight hours.
LightRecycle Washington collection sites will take traditional fluorescent tubes (including straight, curved and circular tubes), the twisty compact fluorescent lights and high intensity discharge lights, which are commonly used in outdoor lighting fixtures.
As an additional benefit, the linear LED light fitting is fitted with an LED module, which can be retrofitted to existing eLLK 92018/18 and eLLK 92036/36 fluorescent light fittings with electronic ballast EVG 09, converting these robust, traditional fluorescent light fittings into LED lights.
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To avoid landfilling Idama will collect fluorescent tubes, compact fluorescent light and energy saving light bulbs for crushing, except LEDs and Halogens which are not compatible with the disposal unit, free of charge.
3) If a fluorescent light fixture has an emergency battery/ballast then the feeder circuit will not be completely de-energized simply by opening the local switch, the feeder circuit should be secured and internal battery enable switch opened to replace the starter.
The lighting company SYLVANIA recently polled peoples' thoughts about various light bulbs, including incandescent and compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFLs).
But a Health and Safety Executive spokeswoman said: "The HSE has taken enforcement action to stop any further mercury recovery operations from fluorescent light tubes and to require decontamination within the factory premises."
Compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFLs) are energy efficient, creating benefits for both the consumer and environment.
A CFL is a small fluorescent light bulb that uses two-thirds less energy than a traditional incandescent bulb and can be screwed into a regular light socket.
The compact fluorescent works much the same way as a standard fluorescent light, but the thin tube curves into a round bulb shape that fits neatly into most lamps.
In most cases, traditional light bulbs will be replaced by much more efficient compact fluorescent light bulbs.

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