hypovolemia

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Related to Fluid loss: insensible fluid loss

hypovolemia

 [hi″po-vo-le´me-ah]
abnormally decreased volume of circulating blood in the body; see also hypovolemic shock. adj., adj hypovole´mic.

hy·po·vo·le·mi·a

(hī'pō-vō-lē'mē-ă), Do not confuse this word with hypovolia.
A decreased amount of blood in the body.
Synonym(s): hyphemia
[hypo- + L. volumen, volume, + G. haima, blood]

hy·po·vo·le·mi·a

(hī'pō-vŏ-lē'mē-ă)
A decreased amount of blood volume in the body.
Synonym(s): hyphemia, hypovolaemia.
[hypo- + L. volumen, volume, + G. haima, blood]
References in periodicals archive ?
It is noted that the difference of % fluid loss was statistically significant for the time periods 0-1 minutes and 3-4 minutes (p < 0.05).
The majority of body fluid losses comes from the formation of urine.
Interestingly, only the faster blood flow rate met both the URR and Kt/V KDOQI target values of Kt/V 1.4 and URR 70%; the slower blood flow rate met only the URR target--even when adjusted for participant weight gain/target fluid loss (Table 4), which may reflect variability in a relatively small sample size, and warrants further study.
At this temperature, the structure of the terpolymer was destroyed and it cannot effectively control fluid loss of the cement slurry.
The properties of fluid loss additive are based on different functional groups of copolymer to be designed in the main chains.
Max Bore HDD: A one-sack system of premium Wyoming bentonite with additives for fluid loss control, enhanced suspension and improved lubricating qualities.
The plastic helps the bladder work properly by trapping body heat and reducing fluid loss.
One of desired properties for muds is the minimum fluid loss volume which can be achieved by formation of a low-permeability filter cake on the wellbore.
Moulton, who hopes to see a first device on the market in 2013, said the technology has other medical applications, such as measuring fluid loss (dehydration) and intracranial pressure (brain injury).
However, it is much less sensitive and specific for women with fluid loss who aren't in labor (SOR: B, 1 prospective cohort study).
The pocket guide also carries illustrations to show them how heat, humidity and hard work can lead to fluid loss and what happens to their body at different stages as fluid loss increases.
Hydrate before, during, and after exercise, as exercise can result in large amounts of body fluid loss. Note that acclimation to a major change in weather takes about one to two weeks.