bud

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bud

 [bud]
1. a structure on a plant, often round, that encloses an undeveloped flower or leaf.
2. something resembling the bud of a plant, especially a protuberance in the embryo from which an organ or part develops.
end bud the remnant of the embryonic primitive knot, from which arises the caudal part of the trunk.
limb bud one of the four lateral swellings appearing in vertebrate embryos, which develop into the two pairs of limbs.
tail bud
the primordium of the caudal appendage.
taste b's end organs of the gustatory nerve containing the receptor surfaces for the sense of taste.
ureteric bud a dorsal outgrowth of the mesonephric duct near its entry into the cloaca; it is the primordium of the ureter, renal pelvis, calices, and collecting tubules of the kidneys.
bud of urethra bulb of urethra.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

bud

(bŭd),
1. An outgrowth that resembles the bud of a plant, usually pluripotential, and capable of differentiating and growing into a definitive structure.
See also: gemmation.
2. To give rise to such an outgrowth.
See also: gemmation.
3. A small outgrowth from a parent cell; a form of asexual reproduction.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

bud

(bŭd)
n.
1. Botany
a. A small protuberance on a stem or branch, sometimes enclosed in protective scales and containing an undeveloped leaf, flower, or leafy shoot.
b. The stage or condition of having buds: branches in full bud.
2. Biology
a. An asexual reproductive structure, as in yeast or a hydra, that consists of an outgrowth capable of developing into a new individual.
b. A small, rounded organic part, such as a taste bud, that resembles a plant bud.
v. budded, budding, buds
v.intr.
1. To put forth or produce buds: a plant that buds in early spring.
2. To reproduce asexually by forming a bud.

bud′der n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

bud

Botany
A small swelling or projection on a plant, from which a shoot, cluster of leaves or flowers develop; a rudimentary, undeveloped shoot, leaf or flower.

Drug slang
A regional term for marijuana.

Embryology
See Syncytial bud.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

bud

(bŭd)
1. An outgrowth that resembles the bud of a plant, usually pluripotential, and capable of differentiating and growing into a definitive structure.
2. To give rise to such an outgrowth.
See also: gemmation
3. A small outgrowth from a parent cell; a form of asexual reproduction.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

bud

an undeveloped embryonic shoot in a plant containing a meristematic area (see MERISTEM) for cell division, surrounded by leaf primordia (immature leaves) with often an outer protective layer of scales formed from modified leaves. The tip of a twig usually carries a terminal bud, while leaves generally have a lateral bud in their AXILS.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
1839 Salicylic acid (chemically related to salicin, the pain-relieving compound named for its source, Salix-willow) was isolated from the flowerbuds of a member of the rose family.
In a few weeks the flowerbuds will appear and you can then move them to your chosen spot for flowering, which needs to be out of direct sunlight and draught-free.
Clusters of flowerbuds start as deep crimson and as they open as flat, umbel-like flowerheads, they turn paler to "a whiter shade of pale".
macrocarpum 'Golden Fragrance', whose flowerbuds are soft yellow and look lovely in pots.
When purchasing an orchid, look for strong, healthy leaves, some unopened flowerbuds, and be sure to inspect it for insects or insect damage.
"When seedlings are about 3 to 6 months old," notes Fitch, "they show flowerbuds that reveal the kind of flowers the trees will soon bear.
Grow on in cool conditions and feed until the flowerbuds show colour, only bringing into a room when you want to impress your friends.
Mites significantly increased shedding of plant organs, mostly leaves but also flowerbuds and young fruit, after 144 DAS.