Nightingale, Florence

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Related to Florence Nightingale: Florence Nightingale Syndrome

Nightingale, Florence

(nīt′ĭn-gāl)
A British philanthropist, 1820–1910, who is considered the founder of nursing as a profession, a formidable statistician, and a pioneering hospital reformer. She was one of many trained nurses to serve in Crimea and dramatically lowered the death rate in the British army by advocating cleanliness and reform of sanitary conditions in hospitals at the battlefront. The astonishing decrease in morbidity and mortality at the front riveted the public both in Britain and in the rest of the West, and the Nightingale Fund gained large contributions from donors around the world. The fund was used to establish a school of nursing at St. Thomas' Hospital in London, England, in 1860. The school became a model for nursing schools around the world, and the first nursing school based on the Nightingale model to be established in the U.S. was at Bellevue Hospital in New York.
References in periodicals archive ?
The service included the Florence Nightingale Lamp being carried through the Abbey - Florence Nightingale earned the name "The Lady with the Lamp" as she would visit soldiers at night with a small lantern in her hand during the Crimean War.
The Florence Nightingale letter will be sold at Hansons Auctioneers, Heage Lane, Etwall, Derbyshire, on July 2.
Florence Nightingale. Scientific American, 250(3), 128-137.
Florence Nightingale today: Healing, Leadership, Global Action (pp.
There is an abundance of information written about the life and times of Florence Nightingale. She is referred to as "The Lady with the Lamp" from her works during the Crimean War and immortalized in a poem, Santa Filomena, written about her by William Wadsworth Longfellow.
"Mae 'na straeon di-ri amdani yn cweryla gyda Florence Nightingale ac yn herio'r awdurdodau.
Florence Nightingale (citas) Federico Rubio y Gali (citas) Aire puro y/o natural "[...] mantener el aire que "[...] se permite a algunos respira tan puro como el aire enfermos que paseen por las de fuera, sin que el paciente galerias y aun salgan al campo a se resfrie" (32:6) respirar el aire completamente libre.
Notwithstanding, it was expected that the ideals of Florence Nightingale (1820-1910) would resonate and again, with further effective supervision especially in these countries in Europe, nurses were not left to pursue their personal predilections per se at the expense of the patient and the rules that govern a particular medical institution or setup.
Co-editors' note: The Florence Nightingale Memorial Fund is available every year, with applications closing on March 31.
A BIRMINGHAM nurse will be the leading light at a special service at Westminster Abbey, celebrating the life of Florence Nightingale.
But none of the 10 council-maintained statues - some other statues of unidentified, mythical or nonfamous women do exist - includes famous Welsh women through the ages, including Welsh nurse heroine and contemporary of Florence Nightingale, Betsi Cadwaladr, nor philanthropists Gwendoline and Margaret Davies.
Thanks to Florence Nightingale, the Crimean War was the last war where more British soldiers died from disease than enemy action.
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