flex

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flexion

 [flek´shun]
1. the act of bending or the condition of being bent.
2. in obstetrics, the normal bending forward of the head of the fetus in the uterus or birth canal so that the chin rests on the chest, thereby presenting the smallest diameter of the vertex.
plantar flexion bending of the toes or foot downwards toward the sole.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

flex

(fleks), In medical contexts, avoid using this word in the colloquial sense of contract (a muscle).
To bend; to move a joint in such a direction as to approximate the two parts that it connects.
[L. flecto, pp. flexus, to bend]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

flex

(flĕks)
v.
1. To bend.
2. To contract a muscle.
3. To move a joint so that the parts it connects approach each other.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

flex

verb
(1) To bend.
(2) To tighten.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

FLEX

Federal licensing exam Graduate education An examination required of physicians before they can practice medicine in the US, which consists of a 3 day multiple-choice assessment of knowlege in 'basic' and 'clinical' sciences
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

flex

(fleks)
To bend; to move a joint in such a direction as to approximate the two parts which it connects.
[L. flecto, pp. flexus, to bend]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Flex

To bend.
Mentioned in: Fingertip Injuries
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The high flex-life cables and cable assemblies are the soLution for a wide range of high flex applications including those found in demanding environments such as the automation industry.
Dynamic flex applications require careful consideration of the entire stackup and desired electrical properties to provide a long service life.
Trainers from Farata Systems walk through their approach to designing scalable Flex applications, building component libraries, and addressing performance issues.
Of the many materials that are used in specialty flex applications, polyimide probably accounts for 90% of the market, so we will use this material as a benchmark for further discussion while touching briefly on a few other materials.
This can be modified in the "static" flex applications with the use of "flexible FR-4." But again, the supplier base for this "patented" application is even further reduced.
New chapters address topics such as embedding Flex applications in Web browsers and building Adobe AIR desktop applications with Flex.