flavonoids


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fla·vo·noids

(flā'vō-noydz),
1. Substances of plant origin containing flavone in various combinations (for example, anthoxanthins, apigenins, flavones, quercitins) and with varying biologic activities.
2. Derviatives of flavone.

fla·vo·noids

(flāvŏ-noydz)
A class of polyphenolic compounds produced by plants as secondary metabolites; ingestion may have benefits as antioxidant.
See: bioflavonoids

flavonoids

A range of many thousands of lipid-soluble polyphenols of low molecular weight, ubiquitous in the plant kingdom. In vitro assays have shown flavonoids to possess antimicrobial, anti-allergic, anti-inflammatory, antithrombotic and anti-neoplastic power. They can modify the actions of numerous enzymes. Some are oestrogenic, some anti-thyroidal. The principal current interest in flavonoids relates to their antioxidant and free radical-scavenging properties which is believed to be the basis of the research findings that these compounds can reduce the risk of atherosclerosis and hence heart attacks and strokes by inhibiting low density lipoprotein oxidation, reducing platelet aggregation, or reducing damage from reperfusion after ischaemia. See also FRENCH PARADOX.

fla·vo·noids

(flāvŏ-noydz)
Substances of plant origin containing flavone in various combinations.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although there are some international studies conducted on the use of flavonoids in the same area.
Flavonoids are thought to keep blood vessels healthy and curb inflammation, which has been linked to both poor heart health and cancer.
But it's also important to note that flavonoid consumption does not counteract all of the increased risks of death caused by smoking and high alcohol consumption.
"But it's also important to note that flavonoid consumption does not counteract all of the increased risk of death caused by smoking and high alcohol consumption.
Flavonoids are polyphenolic substances which are found everywhere of plants and having a structure of benzo-[gamma]-pyrone (6).
Tea Composition GREEN TEA catechins (70%) polyumeric flavonoids (20%) flavonols (10%) BLACK TEA thearubigins (70%) theaflavins (12%) flavonols (10%) catechins (8%) Note: Table made from pie chart.
The cells were also exposed to combinations of flavonoids and imatinib at I[C.sub.50] and lower doses (Table 1 and Table 2).
Objective: In this exploratory study, we aimed to assess the independent associations between dietary intake of total flavonoids and common flavonoid classes with the prevalence and 15-y incidence of AMD.
Research has suggested that dietary flavonoids may hold a lot of benefits for human health.
The most prominent compounds in Baccharis are diterpenoids, phenolic compounds like flavonoids and coumarins, and triterpenoids, among others.
A recent study isolated alkaloids, flavonoids, benzofuran, and triterpenoid from the roots of Sophorae Radix.