flavivirus

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Flavivirus

 
a genus of flaviviruses of worldwide distribution, containing about 75 species in 9 serogroups. It includes the viruses that cause yellow fever, dengue, Japanese B encephalitis, Kyasanur Forest disease, St. Louis encephalitis, tick-borne encephalitis, and West Nile encephalitis. Mosquitoes are the most common vector, with some species being tick-borne and some having no known vector.

flavivirus

 [fla´vĭ-vi″rus]
any in a family of RNA viruses that includes significant causes of human disease. See Flavivirus and Hepacivirus.

Fla·vi·vi·rus

(flā'vi-vī'rŭs),
A genus in the family Flaviviridae that includes yellow fever, dengue, and St. Louis encephalitis viruses.
[L. flavus, yellow, + virus]

flavivirus

(flā′vĭ-vī′rəs)
n. pl. flavivi·ruses
Any of a genus of RNA viruses that are transmitted by insects and ticks, including the viruses that cause yellow fever, dengue, and various types of encephalitis.

fla·vi·vi·rus

(flā'vi-vī-rŭs)
A genus in the family Flaviviridae that includes yellow fever, dengue, and St. Louis encephalitis viruses.
[L. flavus, yellow, + virus]

flavivirus

A member of the flavivirus genus of the Flaviviridae family. Flaviviruses are arthropod-borne (arbor) viruses and can cause encephalitic or meningitic diseases including Japanese encephalitis, West Nile virus encephalitis, St. Louis encephalitis and Murray Valley encephalitis.

Flavivirus

An arbovirus that can cause potentially serious diseases, such as dengue, yellow fever, Japanese encaphilitis, and West Nile fever.
Mentioned in: West Nile Virus
References in periodicals archive ?
In cases of secondary flavivirus infection, a microneutralization test might not discriminate between the past and recent infecting viruses, leading to an assumption of just a recent flavivirus exposure.
TLR7 Plays Immune Roles in Somatic Cells and Skin during Flavivirus Infection. The structure of TLR7 is similar in both mammals and avians; however, whether the function of TLR7 is likely between different species has not been clear [58].
This guidance also applies to pregnant women with laboratory evidence of presumptive Zika virus or flavivirus infection; timing of infection cannot be determined (Table 1).
Like most disease associated with flavivirus infection, WNV infection may be either silent or overt with a range of signs and symptoms.
Because the role of receptor binding in flavivirus infections is to trigger endocytosis, a peculiar feature of flavivirus infections, at least in vitro, has been the ability of antibodies to increase viral uptake, a phenomenon referred to as antibody-dependent enhancement of infection.
Whereas primary Zika virus infections typically generate highly specific neutralizing antibodies, secondary flavivirus infections show a high degree of cross-reactivity (6,15,16).
Her research interest focus is on the serologic diagnosis of flavivirus infections.
Preliminary data suggest that plaque reduction neutralization testing (PRNT) might not discriminate between Zika virus and other flavivirus infections, particularly in persons with previous flavivirus exposure (8), which complicates interpretation of serologic testing (IgM antibody test and PRNT).
Molecular diagnosis of flavivirus infections is usually performed with blood or serum samples during the viremic period, which is sustained for [approximately equal to] 5-7 days (3).
In primary flavivirus infections (i.e., the first time a person is infected with a flavivirus), PRNT also can be used to identify the infecting virus.
However, the InBios kits account for antigenicsin associated with secondary flavivirus infections and reports results as Zika virus positive, possible Zika virus positive, or presumptive other flavivirus positive or negative on the basis of calculations of optical density ratios obtained from a sample with the 3 different antigens.
Virus-specific cross-neutralization testing can be used to discriminate between cross-reacting antibodies in primary flavivirus infections, although neutralizing antibodies might still yield cross-reactive results in persons who were previously infected or vaccinated against a related flavivirus (i.e., secondary flavivirus infection).