flashback

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flash·back

(flash'bak),
1. An involuntary recurrence of some aspect of a hallucinatory experience or perceptual distortion occurring some time after ingestion of the hallucinogen that produced the original effect and without subsequent ingestion of the substance.
2. In posttraumatic stress disorder (q.v.), the sensations resulting from strong emotional sequences acting as triggers.

flashback

(flăsh′băk′)
n.
a. Psychiatry A recurring, intensely vivid mental image of a past traumatic experience: soldiers who had flashbacks of the war.
b. An unexpected recurrence of the effects of a hallucinogenic drug long after its original use.
c. A vivid memory that arises spontaneously or is provoked by an experience.
d. An experience that has characteristics of an earlier experience.
Psychiatry A non-drug-related recurrent recollection of a traumatic event, frightening experience or image, as may affect ex-soldiers, e.g., Vietnam veterans; the recurrence of a past memory, feeling, or perception
Substance abuse An involuntary recurrence of some aspect of a hallucinatory experience or perceptual distortion often with negative overtones and accompanied by fear and anxiety; flashbacks are an adverse effect classically associated with psychedelic drugs—e.g., LSD and PCP—which occur days to weeks after the last dose; flashbacks are common in heavy users and disappear with time

flashback

Psychology A non-drug-related repetition of frightening experiences or images, which may affect ex-soldiers, as is well-described in veterans of the Vietnam conflict Substance abuse Hallucinogen persisting perception disorder an involuntary recurrence of some aspect of a hallucinatory experience or perceptual distortion often with negative overtones and accompanied by fear and anxiety; flashbacks are an adverse effect classically associated with psychedelic drugs–eg, LSD and PCP, which occur days to wks after the last dose; flashbacks are common in heavy users and disappear with time. See LSD, PCP.
Flashback-hallucinogen persisting perception disorder
A The re-experiencing, after discontinuating use of a hallucinogen, of 1+ perceptual symptoms experienced while intoxicated with the hallucinogen, eg geometric hallucinations, flashes of colors, macropsia, micropsia, etc
B Symptoms in A cause significant distress or impairment of social, occupational, or other important function
C Symptoms are not due to a general medical condition, or otherwise accounted for by another mental disorder
*DSM-IV American Psychiatric Association, Washington, DC 1994

flash·back

(flash'bak)
An involuntary recurrence of some aspect of a hallucinatory experience or perceptual distortion occurring some time after ingestion of the hallucinogen that produced the original effect and without subsequent ingestion of the substance.

Flashback

The re-emergence of a traumatic memory as a vivid recollection of sounds, images, and sensations associated with the trauma. The person having the flashback typically feels as if they are reliving the event. Flashbacks were first described by doctors treating combat veterans of World War I (1914–1918).
Mentioned in: Stockholm Syndrome
References in periodicals archive ?
Anna's most frequent flashback is the day Collins returned home from a trip to Las Vegas last spring.
Witt recommend that flashback arrestor users test the non-return valve, body leak tightness and flow capacity annually using Witt's special test equipment.
The odds ratios of suicide attempt also were significantly elevated for the other exposed groups (OR 2.5 for exposed, 4 for those with flashbacks, 7 for those with wider symptoms).
* Subjects confronted with at least one traumatic event who had experienced flashback symptoms.
In my flashback, I chose not to look more closely or inquire further and retreated inside to hover round the dance floor.
He had informed his GP he was having flashbacks as he had been around King's Cross at the time of the London bombings.
Nicholas Gareth-Jones, prosecuting, said to the jury: 'Mr Mears says he doesn't remember what happened yet he insists he didn't assault this woman on the basis of not having any flashbacks. Did she dream the whole thing?
I cannot concentrate on my school work because I suffer flashbacks to this incident.
The breakdown of their mental capacities has left them vulnerable to time disorientation and traumatic flashbacks.
The satirical structure and style of the novel are suggested by an epigraph from Mark Twain's travel book Following the Equator: "I could never tell a lie that anybody would doubt, nor a truth that anybody would believe." The frame-story begins as a wryly humorous, metafictional first-person journal with the structural irony of abruptly shifting, alternating sub-sections of flashbacks and retrospective narrative that reveal in various lengths separated by three "x's," rather than specific dates, his childhood ambition to become a serious writer and his modernist literary aesthetic.
Like flashbacks, historical newsreels are interspersed with these images.
Sweetly lensed flashbacks reveal that 25 years earlier, three young bucks and their female pal, Lole Trintignant), lived an idyllic life of sea and sun and golden camaraderie.