flagellant

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A person who willingly subjects himself to whipping or scourging, as a religious penitent, or as a sexual masochist

flagellant

(flăj′ĕ-lănt) [L. flagellum, whip]
1. Pert. to a flagellum.
2. Pert. to stroking in massage.
3. One who practices flagellation.

flagellant

A person who whips himself, or who is whipped by another, especially for purposes of sexual arousal and gratification.
References in periodicals archive ?
Adding complication to these insights, The Flagellants was released in America in 1967--at the height of the Black Arts Movement.
Thus, Cohn highlighted an apocalyptic tradition over the ages and nations, which included the Flagellants, who murdered the Jews of Frankfurt in 1349, the 16th-century theocracy of Munster, the leaders of the German peasants' war and the Ranters of the English Civil War.
If the treacle failed to rid you of your bulbous black spots, you could join a procession of flagellants and march across Europe beating the plague out of your body with a studded whip.
The waves of the plague were intersper sed with the growing popularity of flagellants, whose "flagellum" became one of the most potent penitential symbols.
Still, it is tempting to draw upon the similiarities in the procession of flagellants that mark both the tenth day of Muharram and Good Friday in such Catholic strongholds as Spain.
Sputnik turned the West into a community of guilt-ridden flagellants in much the way the Black Plague had affected medieval Europeans.
For instance: the episode of the "helmet of Mambrino" (item 18) was given a 2.0 magnitude, whereas Don Quixote's attacking some flagellants was given a 7.1 magnitude.
The flagellants shed their blood in imitation of Christ and for the remission of their sins.
asserted that "it has been rightly said that even Klaus Fuchs, the Rosenburgs and others who betrayed the atomic secrets of Los Alamos would have been afraid to tamper with the soul-shattering secrets of the black-hooded, naked flagellants who enact a sacrament of torture, agony and death each Easter and then soak the New Mexico soil with the blood of their `Christ'" (Lefebure quoted in Weigle 1976: 109).
These include: the nationalist social critic Georges Deherme and his Les Classes moyennes: etude sur le parasitisme social of 1912; the lawyer Adolphe Thery and his Manuel pratique de la lutte antipornographique of 1927; the Hungarian doctor a nd journalist Max Nordau whose important work Degeneration was translated and went through seven editions in 1894; Armand Dubarry's Les Flagellants of 1898; Marcello Fabri's 1921 novel L'Inconnu sur les villes which figures the War as a female vampire draining male bodies of their virility; the homophobic novelist Michel Ducoglay's Chez les mauvais garcons and Sous le col bleu of 1938; Charles-Etienne's Notre-Dame de Lesbos of 1919; Colette's Le Pur et l'impur of 1932; also on lesbianism, the numerous essays on Renee Vivien (who died in 1909).
While this probably didn't make her Wimple of the Month with the 5am flagellants, Teresa did set out, with her friend St John of the Cross, to establish convents and monasteries throughout Spain and to write mystical, almost erotic tracts on Christian love.