broken windows theory

(redirected from Fixing Broken Windows)
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broken windows theory

A theory in criminology supported by various experiments regarding the norm-setting and signalling effects of urban chaos (e.g., broken windows, disrepair of buildings, poorly groomed parks, etc.) and vandalism on further crime and anti-social behaviour.

While interpretations of the data differ according to the author, the experiments suggest that correction of small problems—which, if left in disrepair, signal an indifference to the community by the powers of authority—prevents that negative message from extending to an entire building, institution or section of a community.
References in periodicals archive ?
This approach means teachers and principals can focus on providing Victorian children with the best education possible, rather than painting walls and fixing broken windows," Mr O'Brien said.
Still, that amount is nothing compared to what they've spent on bandages, ice packs and fixing broken windows.
He plans to reopen the shop next week after fixing broken windows and damage from rockets and bullets.
They argued that fixing broken windows, or removing signs of urban decay, does more to reduce crime than conventional policing based on responding to incidents.
They performed short plays illustrating the normal working duties of Mrs Leeson, like fixing broken windows, before singing a specially-composed song about her.
It could mean vandals paying for their sins by cleaning up graffiti or fixing broken windows.
Company secretary Neil Taylor said the list ranged from fitting a pounds 2 light bulb and pounds 5 on ``removing vegetation at front entrance'' to fixing broken windows and painting the building's outside.
By fixing broken windows, the neighbourhood demonstrates that it will not tolerate disorderly behaviour, and therefore, crime.
GLASS: Fixing broken windows is a common job which can lead to accidents.
This approach to rime fighting is based on what has come to be known as the "Broken Windows" theory, after the 1996 book Fixing Broken Windows coauthored by George Kelling, a professor of criminology at Rutgers University.
Most agencies involved in these approaches are following the ideas of authors George Kelling and Catherine Coles in their book Fixing Broken Windows on the need to restore order in our neighborhoods and enforce appropriate behavior in public areas.