nonvolatile acid

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nonvolatile acid

An acid, such as lactic acid or sulfuric acid, that accumulates in the body as a result of digestion, disease, or metabolism. It cannot be excreted from the body by ventilation but must be excreted by organs other than the lungs, e.g., by acidification of the urine.
See also: acid
References in periodicals archive ?
An elevated anion gap is highly suggestive of an accumulation of fixed acids. In this case, the anion gap 24 mEq/L and suggests the accumulation of fixed acid consistent with lactic acidosis.
Comparing Figures 1 and 2, it is found that at a fixed concentration of the inhibitor and a fixed acid concentration, the mass loss taking place at 333 K is in most of the instances higher than that occurring 303 K indicating that the inhibition efficiency of AZI extract decreases with increase in temperature.
The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms (ATF) implemented a temporary rule to amend the amelioration and sweetening limitations so that wines made exclusively from any fruit (excluding grapes) or berry with a fixed acid content of 20 or more parts per thousand are entitled to a volume of up to 60 percent ameliorating material.
An elevated anion gap is highly suggestive of an accumulation of fixed acids. In this case, the anion gap 20 mEq/L and suggests the accumulation of fixed acid consistent with lactic acidosis.
"The acids in the body are classified as volatile acids (carbonic acid, [H.sub.2][CO.sub.3]) and fixed acids, which are nonvolatile acids ingested from the diet or produced within the body as intermediary or end products of metabolism.
"The kidneys are involved in the disposal of the fixed acids that are produced daily.
"To assure disposal of the fixed acids by the kidneys and to sustain the bicarbonate buffer system, the blood concentration of HC[O.sub.-3] must be sustained and HC[O.sub.-3] must be regenerated, which is the other role of the kidneys.
DISCUSSION: The renal acid-base homeostasis may be broadly divided into two processes: (1) reabsorption of filtered HCO3-, which occurs fundamentally in the proximal convoluted tubule; and (2) excretion of fixed acids through the titration of urinary buffers and the excretion of ammonium, which takes place primarily in the distal nephron.
Leave extracts of Wilbrandia ebracteata was tested for the presence of fixed acids, alkaloids, anthocyanins, anthocyanidines, aurones, antranols, quartenary bases, catequins, chalcones, cianogenic heterosides, coumarins, cucurbitacins, flavones, flavonols, flavanones, flavononols, phenols, quaternary bases, quinones, resins, saponins, steroids, tannins, triterpenoids and xanthones.
HEWE reacted positively for fixed acids, steroids, flavones, flavonols, flavanones, flavononols, saponins, tannins and xanthones; and reacted negatively for alkaloids, anthocyanins, anthocyanidins, antranols, aurones, quaternary bases, catequins, chalcones, coumarins, phenols, cianogenic heterosides, quinones, resins and triterpenoids, including cucurbitacins (tetracyclic triterpenes).
These are subdivided into Fruit quality and soluble solids; Alcoholometry; Extract; Hydrogen ion (pH) and fixed acids; Volatile acids; Carbohydrates - reducing sugars; Phenolic compounds and wine colour; Oxygen, carbon dioxide and ascorbic acid; Sulphur dioxide, Sulphur containing compounds; Other preservatives - sorbic acid, benzoic acid and dimethyldicarbonate; Wine microbiology; Tartaric acid and its salts; Copper; Iron and phosphorus; Nitrogenous compounds; Fining and fining agents; Correction of tartrate instabilities; and Removal of copper and iron - the Hubach analysis.
An increased anion gap is likely due to an accumulation of fixed acids, whereas a normal anion gap suggests the patient has lost base.