Mycobacterium marinum

(redirected from Fish tank granuloma)

My·co·bac·te·ri·um ma·ri·'num

a bacterial species causing spontaneous tuberculosis in salt water fish; it also occurs in other cold-blooded animals, in some aquaria and swimming pools in which it may cause human cutaneous infection (see swimming pool granuloma), irrigation canals and ditches, and ocean beaches.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

Mycobacterium marinum

An atypical mycobacterium belonging to Runyon group 1. Mycobacterium marinum is a photochromogen (i.e., it produces pigment when cultured and exposed to light). It lives in fresh or salt water, with optimal growth at 32°C; it causes chronic ulcerating granulomatous lesions, which may evolve into a sporotrichosis-like disease with ascending lymphangitis or spread to deeper tissues.

Management
Two-agent therapy with rifampin, rifabutin, ethambutol, clarithromycin and sulfonamides, including trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

Mycobacterium marinum

Infectious disease A mycobacterium that lives in fresh or salt water, causing chronic ulcerating granulomatous lesions. See Swimming pool granuloma.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

My·co·bac·te·ri·um ma·ri·num

(mī'kō-bak-tēr'ē-ŭm mā-rē'nŭm)
A bacterial species causing tuberculosis in saltwater fish; it also occurs in other cold-blooded animals, in some swimming pools in which it may cause human cutaneous infection, in irrigation canals and ditches, and on ocean beaches.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Fish tank granuloma caused by Mycobacterium marinum in two aquarists: Two case reports.
marinum infections are most often seen in people who have contact with aquariums, fish tanks, and aquatic animals, leading to the name "fish tank granulomas." (1)
Bodnarova, "Fish tank granuloma caused by Mycobacterium marinum in two aquarists: two case reports," BioMed Research International, vol.
(1) In humans, M marinum most commonly infects the skin, (specifically the extremities) in contact with contaminated water or infected animals, resulting in a disease commonly referred to as "aquarium granuloma" or "fish tank granuloma." (1,2)
Mycobacterium marinum infection causes what's commonly known as "fish tank granuloma," said Dr.
To the Editor: Mycobacterium marinum infections, commonly known as fish tank granuloma, produce nodular or ulcerating skin lesions on the extremities of healthy hosts.
Two cases of Mycobacterium marinum soft tissue infection (ie, fish tank granuloma) are presented.
A clinical diagnosis of fish tank granuloma was made, and the patient was begun on oral, double-strength trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole twice daily.