fire ant

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Related to Fire ants: Carpenter ants, Army ants

fire ant

any of several species in the genus Solenopsis the bite of which causes a fiery, burning sensation and sometimes severe allergic reactions.
See also: solenopsin A.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

fire ant

n.
Any of various ants of the genus Solenopsis that build large mounds and can inflict a painful sting, especially S. invicta, native to South America and naturalized in the southern United States.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
Any of a family of omnivorous nonwinged stinging hymenopteran arthropods that attack people, livestock, crops, electric insulation, etc., of which there are 280+ species world-wide; fire ants inject venom, causing intense (’fire-like’) burning and pruritus, due to necrotoxin or solenamine; reactions range from a wheal-and-flare response, to sterile pustules within 24 hours to severe chest pain, nausea, severe sweating, dyspnoea, oedema, or slurred speech, to anaphylaxis-related death
Management Avoid if possible; prompt topical steroids, antihistamines, epinephrine—Epipen, repeat if needed
Environmental management—fighting fire (ant) with fire Phoridae is a family of small, hump-backed flies, some species of which—e.g., Pseudacteon tricuspis and Pseudacteon curvatus—parasitise the red fire ant in its native South America. It is being introduced in Arkansas and Texas and appears to be successful in controlling the ants
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

fire ant

Medical entomology A nonwinged hymenopteran arthropod which is omnivorous, attacking livestock, crops, electric insulation; the FA injects a venom, causing intense burning and pruritus, due to necrotoxin or solenamine; reactions range from a wheal-and-flare response, a sterile pustule within 24 hrs to anaphylaxis-related death
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

fire ant

(fīr ant)
Any of several species in the genus Solenopsis the bite of which causes a fiery burning sensation and sometimes severe allergic reactions.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
A review of the biological control of fire ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).
They created high-stress conditions by either exposing the lizards to fire ants or by dosing them every week with the stress-relevant hormone corticosterone dissolved in oil.
Red imported fire ants exhibit two social forms that vary in several important behavioral and physiological traits (Porter and Savignano, 1990; Ross and Shoemaker, 1997; Mescher el al., 2003; Saddoris et al, 2016).
'If they fail to do so, we will double our quarantine efforts to thoroughly inspect the containers.' One June 18, 700 fire ants were discovered in concrete cracks at a container terminal in Pyeongtaek, west of Seoul.
Randob's year-old Fire-Out, targeted for fire ant stings and bites, comes in a roll-on applicator to cover the sting "zone" of the body.
To start off, fire ants already have a genetic advantage.
This is consistent with previous studies that the abundance of dolichoderine ants was lower in areas with fire ants and that these ants increased in abundance when fire ants were removed (Calixto et al., 2007a, b).
* Fire ants damage property and are costly to control.
Besides their professional mosquito control spray, the pest extermination team now offers mosquito misting systems, fire ant control and rodent control.
Most of the foraging activity in fire ants develops in underground tunnels, but having larger workers in a colony may be useful for occasional aboveground foraging bouts.
Despite not presenting a physical danger to humans (they have no stingers; they can bite but it's not terribly painful, especially considering the other ant species common to the southern states like fire ants), untreated crazy-ant populations can wreak havoc on residential spaces.