Finkelstein test

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Finkelstein test

(fink'ĕl-stīn),
test to detect de Quervain tenosynovitis in which the thumb is flexed into the palm and is covered by the remaining four digits; the wrist is then bent toward the ulna; positive result of test produces pain and crepitus along the path of the involved tendon.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

Fin·kel·stein test

(fing'kĕl-shtīn test)
Assay to detect de Quervain tenosynovitis in which the thumb is flexed into the palm and is covered by the remaining four digits; the wrist is then bent toward the ulna; positive result of test produces pain and crepitus along the path of the involved tendon.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Finkelstein test

(fing′kĕl-stīn″)
[H. Finkelstein, U.S. Surgeon, 1865–1939]
A test to assist in the diagnosis of de Quervain disease. The patient tucks the thumb in a closed fist, and the examiner deviates the fist ulnarly. Pain indicates a positive result.
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

Finkelstein,

Harry, U.S. surgeon, 1865-1939.
Finkelstein maneuver
Finkelstein test - test indicative of de Quervain tenosynovitis.
Medical Eponyms © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
The major finding in patients with de Quervain's tenosynovitis is a positive Finkelstein's test. To perform Finkelstein's test (figure 6), ask the patient to oppose the thumb into the palm and flex the fingers of the same hand over the thumb.
Caption: FIGURE 6 Finkelstein's test Instruct the patient to perform a hook grip.
Perform Finkelstein's test after injection and palpate the first compartment, to determine if the injection was effective.
(12) Epidemiological studies in industrial settings have shown a point prevalence of 8% when wrist pain and a positive Finkelstein's test, with or without tenderness to palpation of the radial wrist were used as diagnostic criteria.
(25) Finkelstein's test is typically positive but should not be relied upon as the only finding for diagnosis of DQST.
The inclusion criteria were positive Finkelstein's test and no response to conservative treatment for three months.
In all cases with negative Finkelstein's test, a successful outcome was observed.
(2-4) Diagnosis is usually concluded by a positive Finkelstein's test (which causes a reproduction of pain at the radial styloid), as well as the presence of a tender nodule over the radial styloid.
A re-evaluation was performed on the eighth visit which revealed a positive Finkelstein's test. In addition to the self-care she was previously prescribed, she was given a small "gua sha" tool to do gentle soft-tissue release on alternate days at home.
Pain at the radial styloid is increased by full flexion of the thumb and forced ulnar deviation of the wrist, a maneuver known as Finkelstein's test. [3,4] The condition may resolve without medical intervention or after treatment with a wrist splint, anti-inflammatory medications, injection of steroid into the tendon sheath, or surgery.
The diagnosis of de Quervain's disease was made on the basis of exquisite tenderness over the radial styloid process and a positive Finkelstein's test. Acetominophen was suggested for pain relief, and she was to return if the pain continued.