fingerprint

(redirected from Fingerprint analysis)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia.
Related to Fingerprint analysis: Fingerprint identification

fingerprint

 [fing´ger-print]
1. an impression of the cutaneous ridges of the fleshy distal portion of a finger.
2. in biochemistry, the characteristic pattern of a peptide after subjection to an analytical technique.
DNA fingerprint (genetic fingerprint) the highly specific hybridization pattern generated by tandem repeats and other patterns of the DNA in an individual's genome.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

fin·ger·print

(fing'gĕr-print),
1. An impression of the inked bulb of the distal phalanx of a finger, showing the configuration of the surface ridges, used as a means of identification.
See also: dermatoglyphics, Galton system of classification of fingerprints.
2. Term, sometimes used informally, referring to any analytic method applicable to making fine distinctions between similar compounds or gel patterns, for example, the pattern of an infrared absorption curve or of two-dimensional paper chromatograph.
3. In genetics, the analysis of DNA fragments to determine the identity of a person or the paternity of a child. Synonym(s): genetic fingerprint
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

fingerprint

(fĭng′gər-prĭnt′)
n.
1.
a. A mark left on a surface by a person's fingertip.
b. An inked impression made of a person's fingertip and used for identification.
2. A distinctive or identifying mark or characteristic: "We can, from his retelling [of the incident], with its particular fingerprint of stresses and omissions, learn a great deal about him" (Mark Slouka).
3.
a. A DNA fingerprint.
b. A chemical fingerprint.
tr.v. finger·printed, finger·printing, finger·prints
To take the fingerprints of.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
Chemistry The ‘signature(s)’ that a chemical compound and its metabolites have when analysed by a highly sensitive technique—e.g., HPLC or GC-MS—which may be stored on a computer’s hard disk and electronically matched—‘fingerprinted’—with an unknown specimen for the purpose of identification
Dermatology An inked impression of the fleshy part of the distal phalanx of the finger, which may be classified per the Galton arch-loop-whorl system; increased ulnar loops and decreased whorls and arches have been reported in males with Alzheimer’s disease and Down syndrome
Molecular biology AA pattern of bands on an agarose gel produced by a clone when restricted by a particular enzyme, e.g., HindIII
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

fin·ger·print

(fing'gĕr-print')
1. An impression of the inked bulb of the distal phalanx of a finger, showing the configuration of the surface ridges, used as a means of identification.
See also: dermatoglyphics, Galton system of classification of fingerprints
2. Term, sometimes used informally, referring to any analytic method capable of making fine distinctions between similar compounds or gel patterns (e.g., the pattern of an infrared absorption curve or of a two-dimensional paper chromatograph).
3. genetics Analysis of DNA fragments to determine the identity of a person or the paternity of a child.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
Enlarge picture
FINGERPRINT

fingerprint

1. A smudge made when oils from the distal portions of the finger come into contact with an object. Fingerprints are used in forensics for personal identification.
2. A unique sequence of nucleotides in a gene, used to identify specific organisms or individuals.
See: illustration
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

fingerprint

1. The unique pattern printed by the ridges of epidermis on the pulpy surfaces of the ends of the fingers and thumbs.
2. Of a protein, the pattern of fragments exposed by electrophoresis after splitting with a proteolytic enzyme such as trypsin.
3. Of DNA, a patterns of varying-length (polymorphic) restriction fragments that differs from one individual to another and that can be used as a means of unique identification.
4. Of a protein, the pattern of fragments produced on a plane surface when a protein is digested by a protein-splitting enzyme. See also DNA FINGERPRINTING.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

fin·ger·print

(fing'gĕr-print')
1. An impression of the inked bulb of the distal phalanx of a finger, showing the configuration of the surface ridges, used as a means of identification.
2. Term for any analytic method capable of making fine distinctions between similar compounds or gel patterns.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
A simple and sensitive H PLC method for the simultaneous determination of eight bioactive components and fingerprint analysis of Schisandra sphenanthera.
According to Chevalier, there are two components involved in fingerprint analysis: the reader and the authentication software.
Green Hills Software, Inc., a leader in embedded software development tools and real-time operating systems, has announced that its INTEGRITY real-time operating system (RTOS) has been selected by Keri Systems for use in its Access Control Device, a multiprocessor platform which securely manages personnel access to single- or multi-building complexes using card readers, number pads, fingerprint analysis and more.
By positively confirming identifications and linking relevant records of arrests and prosecutions, fingerprint analysis provides a basis for making fundamental criminal justice decisions regarding detention, charging, bail, and sentencing.
Principal applications include homeland security, medical image comparisons, fingerprint analysis, and retinal scans.
"We are waiting for fingerprint analysis so we can identify the person and we hope to have that by the end of today."
The Swedish security group Gunnebo AB said today (10 April) that it had acquired 654,000 B shares in the electronic fingerprint analysis technology company Fingerprint Cards AB.
This determination was meant to characterize the diversity of strains in any one area or region and allow for more accurate interpretation of results of DNA fingerprint analysis.
A leading expert in fingerprint analysis who was involved in one of the region's most baffling murder hunts has retired after 37 years.
Following a two-year effort by defense lawyers to hold fingerprint analysis to standards set by the Supreme Court in the 1993 Daubert v.
Police departments employ and train personnel in such forensic areas as evidence collection and analysis, fingerprint analysis, and blood-spatter evidence.
This system is still in use today Fingerprint analysis remains a primary identification technique because no two people, even identical twins, have exactly the same fingerprint patterns.