fingerprint

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fingerprint

 [fing´ger-print]
1. an impression of the cutaneous ridges of the fleshy distal portion of a finger.
2. in biochemistry, the characteristic pattern of a peptide after subjection to an analytical technique.
DNA fingerprint (genetic fingerprint) the highly specific hybridization pattern generated by tandem repeats and other patterns of the DNA in an individual's genome.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

fin·ger·print

(fing'gĕr-print),
1. An impression of the inked bulb of the distal phalanx of a finger, showing the configuration of the surface ridges, used as a means of identification.
See also: dermatoglyphics, Galton system of classification of fingerprints.
2. Term, sometimes used informally, referring to any analytic method applicable to making fine distinctions between similar compounds or gel patterns, for example, the pattern of an infrared absorption curve or of two-dimensional paper chromatograph.
3. In genetics, the analysis of DNA fragments to determine the identity of a person or the paternity of a child. Synonym(s): genetic fingerprint
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

fingerprint

(fĭng′gər-prĭnt′)
n.
1.
a. A mark left on a surface by a person's fingertip.
b. An inked impression made of a person's fingertip and used for identification.
2. A distinctive or identifying mark or characteristic: "We can, from his retelling [of the incident], with its particular fingerprint of stresses and omissions, learn a great deal about him" (Mark Slouka).
3.
a. A DNA fingerprint.
b. A chemical fingerprint.
tr.v. finger·printed, finger·printing, finger·prints
To take the fingerprints of.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
Chemistry The ‘signature(s)’ that a chemical compound and its metabolites have when analysed by a highly sensitive technique—e.g., HPLC or GC-MS—which may be stored on a computer’s hard disk and electronically matched—‘fingerprinted’—with an unknown specimen for the purpose of identification
Dermatology An inked impression of the fleshy part of the distal phalanx of the finger, which may be classified per the Galton arch-loop-whorl system; increased ulnar loops and decreased whorls and arches have been reported in males with Alzheimer’s disease and Down syndrome
Molecular biology AA pattern of bands on an agarose gel produced by a clone when restricted by a particular enzyme, e.g., HindIII
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

fin·ger·print

(fing'gĕr-print')
1. An impression of the inked bulb of the distal phalanx of a finger, showing the configuration of the surface ridges, used as a means of identification.
See also: dermatoglyphics, Galton system of classification of fingerprints
2. Term, sometimes used informally, referring to any analytic method capable of making fine distinctions between similar compounds or gel patterns (e.g., the pattern of an infrared absorption curve or of a two-dimensional paper chromatograph).
3. genetics Analysis of DNA fragments to determine the identity of a person or the paternity of a child.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
Enlarge picture
FINGERPRINT

fingerprint

1. A smudge made when oils from the distal portions of the finger come into contact with an object. Fingerprints are used in forensics for personal identification.
2. A unique sequence of nucleotides in a gene, used to identify specific organisms or individuals.
See: illustration
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners

fingerprint

1. The unique pattern printed by the ridges of epidermis on the pulpy surfaces of the ends of the fingers and thumbs.
2. Of a protein, the pattern of fragments exposed by electrophoresis after splitting with a proteolytic enzyme such as trypsin.
3. Of DNA, a patterns of varying-length (polymorphic) restriction fragments that differs from one individual to another and that can be used as a means of unique identification.
4. Of a protein, the pattern of fragments produced on a plane surface when a protein is digested by a protein-splitting enzyme. See also DNA FINGERPRINTING.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

fin·ger·print

(fing'gĕr-print')
1. An impression of the inked bulb of the distal phalanx of a finger, showing the configuration of the surface ridges, used as a means of identification.
2. Term for any analytic method capable of making fine distinctions between similar compounds or gel patterns.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
This process is repeated when the person wants to leave the facility, except that the proximity card and fingerprint readers are located inside the secure perimeter.
The combination of the BioTouch fingerprint reader with BioLogon 2.0 software provides breakthrough security and convenience for today's laptop professional.
Toshiba's Portege M700-$7002 convertible tablet has all the attributes Toshiba has become known for, including an integrated SuperMulti drive media reader, a fingerprint reader, integrated Webcam, Bluetooth, and a very responsive digitized pen.
For added security, the series includes a fingerprint reader and a 3D accelerometer hard drive protection system.
However, the private key can now only be released from the trusted device once the appropriate user gains access through the fingerprint reader."
A built-in fingerprint reader provides biometric security Its Speak Anywhere audio system combines an advanced dual microphone array with software that allows physicians to dictate patient information while walking, without the need for a headset.
It has recently become an attractive and viable option for the banking industry, because the costs of producing the chips used in the fingerprint reader has dropped from pounds 60 in 2001 to just pounds 4 in 2003, with a mouse combined with a fingerprint reader costing just pounds 49.99.
Enrolled consumers touch the payment terminal's fingerprint reader, then use the terminal to select whether they will pay for orders via electronic check, credit or debit card.
Prodem passed and instead went to work on its own, combing a De La Rue cash dispensing system, Gemplus smart card technology and a fingerprint reader made by Digital Persona, a U.S.
With the NCIC-2000 system, police officers will be able to quickly identify fugitives and missing persons by placing a subject's finger on a fingerprint reader in a patrol car.
The Apple Touch ID could be making a comeback for the next set of Apple iPhones as the Cupertino company is said to be mulling over an in-display fingerprint reader technology.
It also supports Windows Hello with a fingerprint reader for fast and secure access.