fight-or-flight response

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fight-or-flight response

(fīt′ôr-flīt′)
n.
A set of physiological changes, such as increases in heart rate, arterial blood pressure, and blood glucose, initiated by the sympathetic nervous system to mobilize body systems in response to stress.

fight-or-flight response

Flight-or-fight response, general adaptation syndrome, stress response Physiology A constellation of physiologic responses to fear or perceived stress imminent danger or anticipated pain, which triggers full-scale CNS activation and release of 'stressors' by adrenal medulla–eg epinephrine and norepinephrine and cortex–eg corticosteroids, mineralocorticoids, kidneys–renin, pancreas–insulin Clinical Tachycardia, ↑ blood flow to muscle, ↑ BP, muscle tone, ↑ O2 consumption, sweating, ↑ respiratory rate, tremor, pallor, ↑ inotropism, vasoconstriction, mydriasis, bronchodilation, hyperglycemia. Cf Relaxation response.
References in periodicals archive ?
Since the fight-or-flight response is designed for physical action, regular exercise is a great way of dissipating the physical manifestations of stress hormones in the body.
Yet brain imaging devices have indicated only roughly the brain regions driving the fight-or-flight reaction.
The viral tracking technique has enabled Loewy to examine what kinds of brain cells command the fight-or-flight response.
This is known as the fight-or-flight response, says Dr.