fictive kin

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fictive kin

(fik′tiv)
A group of individuals chosen as a surrogate family by a genetically unrelated person; an adopted family.
References in periodicals archive ?
Among their topics are whether turning the other cheek to a perpetrator is a renunciation or upholding of justice, from Markan narrative in print to Markan narrative in performance: a paradigm shift, breathing new life into narrative criticism: post-classical narratology and the Gospel of Luke, there are no aporias: ancient media culture and the problem of the fourth gospel's composition-history, and fictive kinship and its symbolism in the literary structures of 1 John.
It acknowledges that families may now consist of persons cohabiting without marriage with or without children, solo parents as defined under RA No.8972 and their children, persons who may not be related by blood but are bonded by "fictive kinship" or ties of love, obligation, familiarity, and responsibility.
Popularly known as "Mit" or blood brothers in Nepal, the "miteri' is a form of fictive kinship widely encountered in the multifarious social settings of the Himalayas, contracted between individuals and sometimes, by extension, between kin groups.
Of special concern in this paper are relations of adoption, fictive kinship, and other ways of relating that are modeled on an idiom of kinship.
What's being invoked here isn't morality or sentimentality or chivalry or economics: this is an assertion of fictive kinship that effectively argues that all cows are Hindu women."
For the purposes of this article, we focus on two concepts found either implicitly and explicitly, in the aforementioned interdisciplinary body of work fictive kinship and intersectionality.
Lauren Derby argues that while Trujillo and his secret police used terror to establish control over the population, Trujillo also consolidated his rule by embracing "popular [cultural] forms such as gossip, gift exchange, fictive kinship, and witchcraft into the repertoire of domination" (p.
With these questions in view, Patterson explores fictive kinship as a broadly Greek and Hellenizing phenomenon (chapter 1), the ostensible credulity of Greek historians (including Thucydides) regarding mythical ancestry as historical (chapter 2), and the literary and epigraphic evidence on kinship diplomacy that includes claims about shared mythical forefathers (chapters 3-5 and 6-7).
They depended on the good faith of the people who made them." The breaking of such bonds meant that the links of fictive kinship that had joined them were already severed.
Within the fictive kinship framework, high achieving African Americans become isolated from their minority collective identity and assimilate into the dominant culture, thereby becoming raceless (Fordham, 1988).
"Or do you mean a gaggle of females of our acquaintance but on whom the term 'aunt' in conferred as an honorific of fictive kinship?" he said in a bid to broaden his enquiry.
It also opens up several promising lines of inquiry about identity in the ancient world more broadly: what is the relationship between fictive kinship and representations of the posthumous, in funerary inscriptions?