fictive kin

fictive kin

(fik′tiv)
A group of individuals chosen as a surrogate family by a genetically unrelated person; an adopted family.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chapter four shows how a religious spirit animated the two schools and considers how they in turn nurtured different kinds of families, or solidarity among fictive kin. Chapter five linked themes from previous chapters and examines how the schools cultivated different kinds of men.
In fact, many state and county child welfare agencies are building on federal law to help children achieve legal permanency through guardianship with relatives and fictive kin. To better understand state policies guiding guardianship, this article presents trends in state statutes and administrative codes for guardianship across all 50 states.
Though certainly not unique to African Americans, the significance of fictive kin in contributing to life satisfaction for African Americans is buttressed by research data (Taylor, Chatters, Hardison, & Riley, 2001).
Fictive Kin legislation was passed and signed into law by my husband as well.
The "your black life matters" message would be the same, but rather than a lone voice exhorting a namesake nephew, The Fire This Time would be a chorus of fictive kin speaking to a generation of African Americans who were raised to identify beyond race, only to find themselves judged yet again by--and, in recent high-profile cases, executed because of--the color of their skin.
More importantly, the intimacy generated by living together may create strong emotional bonds that cause fictive kin to act like kin, or more extended kin to act like adult children.
It could be said that fictive kin address is very much part of Kelabit custom.
As the book well shows, making land productive required labor, the labor of both men and women, labor that was mostly organized through families with three dimensions, the male-female partnership among adults of prime working age, their intergenerational relationships with their elders and their children, and the wider networks provided extended families of both biological and fictive kin. Distinct microclimates allowed different kinds of products, and each product required specific forms of labor: cowboys and shepherds, seasonal harvesters, people to plow, plant, weed, and process, people to make handicrafts or work in packing sheds.
Analytically separating Black southerners from their migrating cousins, fictive kin, and white counterparts, Robinson demonstrates how place intersects with race, class, gender, and regional identities and differences.