Fetal tissue transplantation

Fetal tissue transplantation

A method of treating Parkinson's and other neurological diseases by grafting brain cells from human fetuses onto the affected area of the human brain. Human adults cannot grow new brain cells but developing fetuses can. Grafting fetal tissue stimulates the growth of new brain cells in affected adult brains.
References in periodicals archive ?
(13.) Advisory Committee to the Director, National Institutes of Health, Human Fetal Tissue Transplantation Research, Bethesda, MD: National Institutes of Health, 1988.
(41) See Andrews, supra note 36, at A-8 (stating that "[o]nce fetal tissue transplantation for diseases such as Parkinson's disease became a possibility, however, legislators did not want women to conceive and abort just to provide tissue needed by a relative").
In addition, because cells derived from fetal tissue at the early stages of investigation may, at a later date, be used in human fetal tissue transplantation research, it is the policy of NIH to require that all NIH-funded research involving the derivation or utilization of pluripotent stem cells from human fetal tissue also comply with the fetal tissue transplantation statute."
One, that fetal tissue transplantation is merely an extension of organ donation, a long and honored form of medical altruism.
Government funding of fetal research has been suspended several times: A 1974 moratorium was lifted in 1975 after regulations concerning such research were promulgated; in 1985, a moratorium was placed on some federally funded fetal research; and in 1988, the assistant secretary for health halted all federally funded research on fetal tissue transplantation while an outside advisory panel examined related ethical, legal and scientific issues.
[13.] Gero E, Giordano J: Ethical considerations in fetal tissue transplantation. J Neurosci Nurs 1990; 22(1):9-12.
The history of human fetal tissue transplantation in the United States has been touch and go.
In response to this request, the Human Fetal Tissue Transplantation Research Panel (HFTTRP) was assembled.
President Bush vetoed the NIH reauthorization bill because it would have overturned the moratorium on fetal tissue transplantation research, and Congress could not muster the two-thirds majority necessary to override the veto.
Martin et al., "Fetal Tissue Transplantation and Abortion Decisions: A Survey of Urban Women," Canadian Medical Association Journal, Sept.
However, despite enthusiasm about the technique's promise, researchers caution that fetal tissue transplantation is still far from offering a cure for Parkinson's or any other disease.