Robinow syndrome

(redirected from Fetal face)

Rob·i·now syn·drome

(rob'i-now), [MIM*180700]
a skeletal dysplasia characterized by bulging forehead, hypertelorism, depressed nasal bridge (so-called fetal face), wide mouth, acromesomelic shortening of limbs, hemivertebrae, and hypoplastic genitalia; there is also an autosomal recessive form [MIM*268310].
See also: fetal face syndrome.
Synonym(s): Robinow dwarfism

Robinow syndrome

An autosomal dominant disorder (OMIM:180700) characterised by short-limb dwarfism, costovertebral segmentation defects and malformations of the head, face and external genitalia.

Molecular pathology
Defects of WNT5A, which encodes a signalling molecule that regulates cell fate and patterning during embryogenesis, cause Robinow syndrome.

Rob·i·now syn·drome

(rob'i-now sin'drōm)
Skeletal dysplasia characterized by bulging forehead, hypertelorism, depressed nasal bridge (so-called fetal face), wide mouth, acromesomelic shortening of limbs, hemivertebrae, and hypoplastic genitalia; there is also an autosomal recessive form.

Robinow,

Meinhard, U.S. physician, 1909–.
Robinow dwarfism - Synonym(s): Robinow syndrome
Robinow mesomelic dysplasia
Robinow syndrome - dwarfism associated with several facial anomalies. Synonym(s): fetal face syndrome; Robinow dwarfism

Rob·i·now syn·drome

(rob'i-now sin'drōm) [MIM*180700]
Skeletal dysplasia characterized by bulging forehead, hypertelorism, depressed nasal bridge (so-called fetal face), and wide mouth.
References in periodicals archive ?
aReveal Anatomically Intelligent Ultrasound (AIUS) 3D fetal face algorithm automatically removes extraneous information to quickly and easily reveal the 3D fetal face.
1; Left) and clear silhouette of fetal face and hand were appreciated through 3D ultrasound imaging (Fig.
The obstetric ultrasound images of the fetal face demonstrate a single midline orbit (Figure 1).
They found that the movements of the fetal face become more complex over time.
Seventy-two international academics and clinicians contribute 33 chapters describing all aspects of the ultrasound diagnosis of fetal anomalies, including central nervous system malformations; normal/abnormal fetal face and neck; fetal echocardiography-diagnosed congenital cardiac problems; anomalies of the lungs, gastrointestinal tract and abdominal wall; urological tract diseases; and skeletal dysplasia.
Parents love to see 3-D images of the fetal face, which has led some nonmedical businesses to offer controversial "entertainment" 3-D ultrasound services in shopping malls and elsewhere.
Value of the electronic scalpel (cut mode) in the evaluation of the fetal face.
Advanced real-time 3D techniques can be helpful in examining a fetus for the presence of cataracts or cleft lip, or even a cleft palate--by obtaining a cross-sectional, reverse view of the fetal face.
The fetal face is covered for the amniotic epithelium, that presents a typical structure (simple plane epithelium).
Sonographers consider that the "weird" or "strange-looking" fetal face at sixteen-to-eighteen weeks may be alarming to women.
One of those options is 3-D Fetal Face, popular among OB/GYN physicians, which provides easier identification of fetal abnormalities and allows expectant parents to view a photograph of their unborn child.