zygote

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Related to Fertilized egg cell: fertilized ovum

zygote

 [zi´gōt]
the cell resulting from union of a male and a female gamete; the fertilized ovum (see also reproduction). More precisely, the cell after synapsis at the completion of fertilization until first cleavage. adj., adj zygot´ic.
Development of the zygote. A, A sperm enters the ovum. B, The 23 chromosomes from the sperm mingle with the 23 chromosomes from the ovum, restoring the diploid number to 46. C, The fertilized ovum, now called a zygote, is ready for the first mitotic cell division. From McKinney et al., 2000.

zy·gote

(zī'gōt),
1. The diploid cell resulting from union of a sperm and a secondary oocyte. Compare: conceptus.
2. The early embryo that develops from a fertilized oocyte.
[G. zygōtos, yoked]

zygote

(zī′gōt′)
n.
1. The cell formed by the union of two gametes, especially a fertilized ovum before cleavage.
2. The organism that develops from a zygote.

zy·got′ic (-gŏt′ĭk) adj.
zy·got′i·cal·ly adv.

zy·gote

(zī'gōt)
1. The diploid cell resulting from union of a sperm and an oocyte.
Compare: conceptus
2. The early embryo that develops from a fertilized oocyte.
[G. zygōtos, yoked]

zygote

An egg (ovum) that has been fertilized but has not yet undergone the first cleavage division. A zygote contains a complete (DIPLOID) set of chromosomes, half from ovum and half from the fertilizing sperm, and thus all the genetic code for a new individual.

zygote

the DIPLOID (1) cell produced by the fusion of the nuclei of male and female gamete nuclei at FERTILIZATION.

Zygote

The result of the sperm successfully fertilizing the ovum. The zygote is a single cell that contains the genetic material of both the mother and the father.

zy·gote

(zī'gōt)
1. Diploid cell resulting from union of a sperm and a secondary oocyte.
2. Early embryo that develops from a fertilized oocyte.
[G. zygōtos, yoked]
References in periodicals archive ?
The researchers transferred this nuclei into another fertilized egg cell which had had its own nuclei removed.
Each fertilized egg cell even establishes two distinct halves, along what is called the anterior-posterior axis.
The mutants are zebra fish, or Danio rerio, and they are the rage among developmental biologists, who study the seemingly miraculous process in which a fertilized egg cell becomes a multicellular adult organism.