Ferguson


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Fer·gu·son

(fĕr'gŭs-ŏn),
J.K.W., 20th-century obstetrician. See: Ferguson reflex.
References in classic literature ?
Ferguson to come in," was the quiet remark of Sir Francis M .
Ferguson's speech in "The Proceedings of the Royal Geographical Society of London."
Ferguson's father, a brave and worthy captain in the English Navy, had associated his son with him, from the young man's earliest years, in the perils and adventures of his profession.
Upon the death of the estimable captain, Samuel Ferguson, then twenty-two years of age, had already made his voyage around the world.
Samuel Ferguson returned to England about 1850, and, more than ever possessed by the demon of discovery, he spent the intervening time, until 1853, in accompanying Captain McClure on the expedition that went around the American Continent from Behring's Straits to Cape Farewell.
So it was with Mr Ferguson. He stopped in his tracks and stared.
'But we can't stop here all night,' said Mr Ferguson, feebly.
'We can't stop here all night,' interrupted Mr Ferguson, bounding from his chair and beginning to pace the floor.
Mr Ferguson, deprived of the solace of song, filled in the time by gazing at the toiler's back-hair.
We got no sight of the countless treasures of art in the Louvre galleries that day, and our only poor little satisfaction was in the reflection that Ferguson sold not a solitary silk dress pattern.
Anything I can do for you?' For several weeks it was: 'What's become of Ferguson?" After that I became a reminiscence and a memory.
It was not until ten o'clock that Daylight parted from Ferguson. As he rode along through the starlight, the idea came to him of buying the ranch on the other side of the valley.