femoral nerve

(redirected from Femoral nerves)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

fem·o·ral nerve

[TA]
arises as a branch of the lumbar plexus, conveying fibers from the second, third, and fourth lumbar nerves through the substance of the psoas muscle and enters the thigh via the retroinguinal muscular space posterior to the inguinal ligament, lateral to the femoral vessels; it arborizes within the femoral triangle into muscle branches to the sartorius, pectineus, and quadriceps muscles and anterior femoral cutaneous branches to the skin of the anterior and medial region of the thigh; its terminal branch is the saphenous nerve by which it supplies the skin of the medial leg and foot.

fem·o·ral nerve

(fem'ŏr-ăl nĕrv) [TA]
Arises from the second, third, and fourth lumbar nerves in the substance of the psoas muscle and enters the thigh through the muscular lacuna beneath the inguinal ligament, lateral to the femoral vessels; it arborizes within the femoral triangle into muscle branches to the sartorius, pectineus, and quadriceps muscles and anterior femoral cutaneous nerves to the skin of the anterior and medial region of the thigh; its terminal branch is the saphenous nerve by which it supplies the skin of the medial leg and foot.
Synonym(s): nervus femoralis [TA] .

femoral nerve

One of the main nerves of the leg. It branches widely to run into the group of large muscles on the front of the thigh and to carry back sensation from the skin on the front and inner aspects.
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore this study is aimed at revealing the macro/micro fascicular anatomy of femoral nerve and its branches, nerves to iliacus by closely sampled histological slides in cranial and caudal directions.
In order to block the femoral nerve, the needle was pulled out to the skin and redirected ventrally aiming the point below the inguinal ligament just lateral to the palpated femoral artery pulsation (Figure 3).
Groin and thigh pain frequently arises from the articular branch of the obturator nerve, whereas trochanteric pain arises from the articular branch of the femoral nerve [8].
Therefore the aim of the present study is to uncover the classified variant anatomy of the femoral nerve, its branching pattern and fascicular structure based on hypothesis extracted from the conclusions of Gustafson et al.
Figure 2 compares the fascicular arrangement of the femoral nerve just proximal to branching between all four femoral nerves.
(2009) studied the origin and distribution of the femoral nerve in fetuses of crossbreed zebu cattle and found that the right and left femoral nerves originated from the ventral branches of L4, L5 and L6 in 14 animals (46.7%), from L4 and L5 in 13 cases (43.3%) and L5 and L6 in three cases (10%), similar to that observed in this study in rabbits and to the results obtained by Silva et al.
We located the femoral nerve through transverse incisions from the ASIS to the pubic symphysis and incisions originating from the midpoint between the ASIS and the pubic symphysis extending longitudinally to the patella.
According to Locher and colleagues, (40) the variability of the femoral nerve course and branches would necessitate coagulation of several square centimeters (ie, greater than or equal to 50 lesions), but no data was provided as to how this calculation was achieved.
Winnie used paresthesia as his end point but as described later in this article today the accepted end point for the lumbar plexus is stimulation of the femoral nerve component, observed by contraction of the quadriceps muscle (5).
Blockade of the femoral nerve anesthetizes the anterior thigh and knee, as well as the medial aspect of the leg and foot (domain of the saphenous nerve).
Postoperative analgesia with "3-in-1" femoral nerve block after prosthetic hip surgery.
The 3-in-1 continuous femoral block involves the injection of local anaesthetic into the perineural sheath surrounding the femoral nerve to obtain blockade of the femoral nerve, obturator nerve and the lateral cutaneous nerve of the thigh.