femoral

(redirected from Femoral head)
Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.
Related to Femoral head: femoral head necrosis

femoral

 [fem´o-ral]
pertaining to the femur or to the thigh.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

fem·o·ral

(fem'ŏ-răl),
Relating to the femur or thigh.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

femoral

(fĕm′ər-əl)
adj.
Of, relating to, or located in the thigh or femur.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

fem·o·ral

(fem'ŏr-ăl)
Relating to the femur or thigh.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

femoral

Pertaining to the thigh or the thigh bone (FEMUR). From Latin femor , thigh.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Nontraumatic osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH), also known as avascular necrosis, is a refractory and progressive disease that commonly affects young patients and has a poorly understood etiology and pathogenesis [1].
A link between systemic steroid use and the development of osteonecrosis of the femoral head has been well documented, but the exact mechanism of action is still debated.
Avascular necrosis of the femoral head, flared long bone metaphysis/epiphysis, enlarged capitulum of the distal humerus have also been reported.
"Dysplasia can make the labrum vulnerable to tears due to instability of the femoral head within the socket," Dr.
Ventro-dorsal hip radiograph was taken which revealed bilateral hip dysplasia with flattened femoral head, shallow acetabulam and subluxation (Fig.1).
(35,52) More than 90% of non-traumatic hip ON cases are estimated to occur secondary to alcohol and corticosteroid use (54) possibly via mechanisms that result in fatty infiltration of bone marrow leading to intraosseus hypertension, vascular compression, and diminished vascularity to the femoral head (55,56).
(8-10) In children more than two years of age who walk on the dislocated joint, in the case of persistent excessive anteversion of the femoral neck and femoral head displacement of more than one-third of the iliac width, both femoral and innominate osteotomies should be considered.
Regarding the diameter of the femoral head, Igbigbi & Msamati (2000) examined radiographs and found higher values for both the vertical diameter (48.30 [+ or -] 3.51 mm, p = 0.001) and transverse diameter (50.55 [+ or -] 3.32 mm, p<0.001) of the head of the femur in males compared to females.
Avascular necrosis/osteonecrosis of femoral head is demonstrated as a photopenic area on bone scintigraphy.
Containment can be achieved by positioning the extruding femoral head in a more covered position.