femoral artery

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Related to Femoral Arteries: Superficial femoral artery

fem·o·ral ar·ter·y

[TA]
origin, continuation of external iliac distal to the inguinal ligament; branches, external pudendal, superficial epigastric, superficial circumflex iliac, deep artery of thigh, descending genicular, terminating as the popliteal artery as it passes through the adductor hiatus to enter the popliteal space.
Synonym(s): arteria femoralis [TA]

femoral artery

n.
The main artery of the thigh, supplying blood to the groin and lower extremity.

fem·o·ral ar·te·ry

(fem'ŏr-ăl ahr'tĕr-ē) [TA]
Origin, continuation of external iliac, beginning at inguinal ligament; branches, external pudendal, superficial epigastric, superficial circumflex iliac, profunda femoris, descending genicular, terminating as the popliteal artery as it passes through the adductor hiatus to enter the popliteal space.
Synonym(s): arteria femoralis [TA] .

femoral artery

The main artery of the leg in the area between the groin and the back of the knee, where it divides into two and passes down to supply the lower leg. The femoral artery supplies all the muscles and other structures of the thigh with blood.

Femoral artery

An artery located in the groin area that is the most frequently accessed site for arterial puncture in angiography.
References in periodicals archive ?
To assess if femoral ultrasonography would add information to that provided by the carotid ultrasonography, the prevalence of increased IMT (defined as IMTgreater than 97.5 percentile; 97.5 percentile was calculated for CIMT - 0.900mm - and FIMT - 0.700 mm - in controls) and plaque in carotid versus carotid plus femoral arteries was compared in all groups (Table-IV).
The main body of the internal iliac artery was adequately patent with good collateralisation to the femoral arteries (Fig.
The femoral arteries are critical to blood supply and if severely wounded, beyond the ballistic-resistant properties of the (CRU), several built-in tourniquets combat this important backup measure and are strategically located in both the upper and lower garments.
Two stiff wires were navigated through the aortic bifurcation (hydrophilic wire exchange) from both femoral arteries. Three peripheral stent grafts were used to reconstruct the aortic bifurcation (Fig.
The anatomical position of a PSA differs from the position of the femoral arteries. The sciatic artery starts at the internal iliac artery and runs through the greater sciatic foramen, from where its course is close to the sciatic nerve.