felony murder rule

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felony murder rule

A legal doctrine in some (English) common law jurisdictions that broadens the legal ramifications of murder to include:
(1) when an offender kills accidentally or without specific intent to kill in the course of an applicable felony, manslaughter is escalated to murder; and
(2) it makes any participant in the felony criminally liable for any deaths that occur during or in furtherance of that felony.
References in periodicals archive ?
2010); see also Kealy, supra note 10, at 237 (discussing felony murder theory in Massachusetts).
To that end, this Part considers the much-debated laws involving felony murder and the divergence between attempts and completed crimes.
Trace Hanse ("Appellant") was convicted by a jury in the Circuit Court for Baltimore City of six charges, including first-degree felony murder and first-degree burglary, stemming from a home invasion during which Sierra Burley and her roommate, Marvin Jeffers, were shot in the head and body.
(84) The Court did not explicitly create a categorical rule with respect to death sentences for felony murder convictions.
In order to convict the defendant of First Degree Felony Murder, it is not necessary for the State to prove that the defendant had a premeditated design or intent to kill.
The felony murder charge includes a sentence enhancement for using a knife.
As an accomplice, he was sentenced under Texas' felony murder statute, commonly known as the law of parties, which holds that anyone involved in a crime resulting in death is equally responsible, even if they weren't directly involved in the killing.
Authorities did arrest Mitchell, whom they charged with aggravated assault with a firearm, false imprisonment, cruelty to children, and felony murder for the death of Funches.
After a nine-day deliberation, a jury has found Pedro Hernandez guilty of felony murder and kidnapping in the death of 6-year-old Etan Patz, who disappeared in 1979 while walking to a bus stop near his home in SoHo, Manhattan.
This disconnect results from an overly mechanical interpretation of the Supreme Court's two key cases applying the Eighth Amendment to the felony murder context: Enmund v.
'I'm just in shock.' Frances insisted it was an accident, but she was charged with felony murder and aggravated assault for her actions against Bonnie.