felon

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whitlow

 [hwit´lo]
herpetic whitlow a primary herpes simplex infection of the terminal segment of a finger, usually seen in those exposed to infected oral or respiratory secretions, such as dentists, physicians, or nurses. It begins with intense itching and pain, followed by the formation of deep coalescing vesicles. The process is associated with much tissue destruction and may be accompanied by systemic symptoms. A similar lesion may occur as a result of nail biting during the course of primary herpetic gingivostomatitis.
melanotic whitlow a malignant tumor of the nail bed characterized by formation of melanotic tissue.

whit·low

(wit'lō),
Purulent infection through a perionychial fold causing an abscess of the bulbous distal end of a finger.
Synonym(s): felon
[M.E. whitflawe]

felon

/fel·on/ (fel´on) a purulent infection involving the pulp of the distal phalanx of a finger.

felon

(fĕl′ən)
n.
A painful purulent infection at the end of a finger or toe in the area surrounding the nail. Also called whitlow.

felon

[fel′ən]
Etymology: L, fel, venom
a suppurative abscess on the distal phalanx of a finger.

felon

Paronychia, whitlow, run-around A purulent infection in the tight fascial plane adjacent to the terminal intraphalangeal joint of the fingers or toes, due to an open wound; as the inflammatory mass expands within the confined space, the vascular supply is compromised, predisposing the site to osteomyelitis, pulp necrosis and sloughing of tissue; the pain is very intense and seemingly disproportionate with the scant amount of swelling and erythema clinically evident Treatment Drainage by incision directly over the site of maximum swelling; the term has also been applied to a localized painful herpetic skin infection 'seeded' in an open abrasion by contact exposure.

fel·on

(fel'ŏn)
A purulent infection or abscess involving the bulbous distal end of a finger.
Synonym(s): whitlow.
[M.E. feloun, malignant]
References in periodicals archive ?
Most felons are non-violent and deserve to have their rights restored.
Ramirez that, indeed, the authors of the Fourteenth Amendment specifically wanted to deny felons the right to vote and it was a state's prerogative to do so if there was a compelling state interest.
McAuliffe's effort to restore voting rights to felons is seen among Republicans as an effort by the Democratic governor to garner more votes for Democrats in the upcoming election.
This is important because, according to the Justice Department, the recidivism rate-the rate at which felons commit new crimes--is alarmingly high, more than 50 percent for many types of offenders.
FELON DISENFRANCHISEMENT in Florida has a long and ugly history.
With a presidential election nearing, felon voting rights is likely to remain a popular topic as candidates from both parties have expressed support for re-engaging citizens whose votes could make a difference in some states.
But the benefits of re-enfranchising felons outweigh the potential problems.
Trying to keep guns out of the hands of felons is praiseworthy.
Jackson, (56) where the court associated a heightened public danger with felons possessing firearms and applauded N.
The Second Circuit, in refusing to label Alsol and Powell as aggravated felons merely because the state could have prosecuted them as recidivists, correctly concluded that the ruling body must base an alien's status as an aggravated felon on an actual conviction.
to prevent dangerous felons from falling through the cracks when it comes to firearm possession," (6) it is not clear that the drafters of the new statute considered all of the potential consequences arising from the changes.