crop

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crop

(krŏp)
n.
Zoology
a. A pouchlike enlargement of a bird's gullet in which food is partially digested or stored for regurgitation to nestlings.
b. A similar enlargement in the digestive tract of annelids and insects.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

crop

  1. in vertebrates, particularly some birds, an expanded part of the oesophagus where food is stored.
  2. in invertebrates, an expansion of the anterior part of the gut system where food is either digested or stored.
  3. the agricultural or commercial fishery yield.
  4. in ecological terms, the difference between gross annual production and the net production - i.e. the material eaten by predators (or herbivores where the food is a vegetable), including that taken by man, and that consumed by organisms responsible for decay. See STANDING CROP.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Livestock's presence in vast tracts of land and its demand for feed crops also contribute to biodiversity loss; 15 out of 24 important ecosystem services are assessed as in decline, with livestock identified as a culprit.
Land used for grazing and for growing feed crops for these animals is often created by clearing forests, which has a negative impact on the industry's carbon footprint, because trees naturally absorb carbon dioxide.
China is the largest importer of genetically engineered crops and one of the largest producers of GE cotton in the world, yet it has not approved any major GE food or feed crops for cultivation.
Mughal said that production of feed crops for cattle would also be improved and improved healthy green feed would be available for cattle.
Future GM feed crops will have enhanced nutritional characteristics.
CF Industries is transforming natural gas into nitrogen, helping feed crops that feed the world and support a cleaner and healthier future.
In addition, intensive livestock production is also responsible for significant biodiversity loss due to conversion of natural habitats to grass and feed crops, the researchers noted.
The way the majority of beef is raised demands a high carbon footprint: Fossil fuels are used to fertilize grain crops and make pesticides, trees must be cleared to make way for feed crops, and then there's the greenhouse gas methane released by belching cows.