omega-3 fatty acid

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omega-3 fatty acid

n.
Any of several polyunsaturated fatty acids that are essential for human metabolism, have anticoagulant properties, and are found in leafy green vegetables, vegetable oils, nuts, and fish such as salmon and mackerel. Increasing dietary intake of omega-3 fatty acids can decrease serum concentrations of triglycerides and LDL cholesterol while increasing HDL cholesterol.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

omega-3 fatty acid

, ?-3 fatty acid
Any of the long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids found in the oils of some saltwater fish, and in canola, flaxseed, walnuts, and some vegetables. These acids include eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Alpha-linolenic acid (found in flaxseed and chia) can be metabolically converted to omega-3 fatty acids in the body. People whose diets are rich in omega-3 fatty acids have a reduced incidence of cardiovascular disease. Synonym: n-3 fatty acid
See also: acid
Medical Dictionary, © 2009 Farlex and Partners
References in periodicals archive ?
In the case of fatty acids, omega-3 supplementation alone doesn't tell the whole story of how this dietary change can affect health, explained Martha Belury, professor of human nutrition at Ohio State and a co-author of the study.
Several dietary patterns were identified with varying levels of seven nutrients previously shown to be associated with Alzheimer's disease risk: saturated fatty acids, monounsaturated fatty acids, omega-3 fatty acids, omega-6 fatty acids, vitamin E, vitamin B12 and folate.

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