infrared

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infrared

 [in″frah-red´]
denoting electromagnetic radiation of wavelength greater than that of the red end of the spectrum, i.e., of 0.75–1000 μm. Infrared rays are sometimes subdivided into long-wave or far infrared (about 3.0–1000 μm) and short-wave or near infrared (about 0.75–3.0 μm). They are capable of penetrating body tissues to a depth of 1 cm. Sources of infrared rays include heat lamps, hot water bottles, steam radiators, and incandescent light bulbs. Infrared rays are used therapeutically to promote muscle relaxation, to speed up the inflammatory process, and to increase circulation to a part of the body. See also heat.

in·fra·red (IR, ir),

(in-fră-red'),
That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum with wavelengths between 730 and 1000 nm.

in·fra·red

(in'fră-red)
That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum with wavelengths between 770-1000 nm.

infrared

the electromagnetic radiation in the region between red light and radio waves. see ELECTROMAGNETIC SPECTRUM.

infrared (IR)

Radiant energy of wavelengths between the extreme red wavelengths of the visible spectrum and a wavelength of a few millimetres. The wave band comprising radiations between 780 and 1400 nm is referred to as IR-A. Excessive exposure to these radiations can cause visual loss (e.g. eclipse blindness) and cataract. The waveband comprising radiations between 1400 and 3000 nm is referred to as IR-B. Excessive exposure to these radiations can cause cataract and corneal opacity. The wave band comprising radiations between 3000 and 1 ✕ 106 nm (or 1 mm) is referred to as IR-C. Excessive exposure to these radiations can cause cataract (heat-ray cataract). See eclipse blindness; absorptive lens; infrared optometer.
References in periodicals archive ?
The COBE detector also measured the total luminosity of galactic dust and recorded the far-infrared emissions from neutral carbon atoms and carbon monoxide in the interstellar gas.
Researchers combined mid- and far-infrared images from SOFIAs cameras with new streamlines that visualize the direction of the magnetic field.
The far-infrared technology market has grown nearly four-fold in the last five years, according to market research group Yole Developpement.
Previously, we prepared the tourmaline-containing functional copolymer p (TUC/BA/ MMA), which displayed an excellent storage stability, excellent mechanical properties, superior performance in far-infrared radiation, and enhanced negative ion release [21].
Combined, they cover the optical, near-, mid- and far-infrared spectrum, and offer unprecedented spectral resolution.
Each subject received four different interventions during the experimental sessions: Session 1 (acupuncture), Session 2 (pseudoacupuncture), Session 3 (far-infrared radiation (FIR)), and Session 4 (acupuncture combined with FIR).
Another space observatory, Herschel, then observed these objects across the far-infrared to submillimeter wavelength range (just a bit shorter than microwaves), but with much higher sensitivity and angular resolution.
But at far-infrared wavelengths, it is possible to peer through the dust, affording Herschel's scientists the chance to study the turbulent innermost region of our Galaxy in great detail.
Far-infrared spectroscopy is closely related to the rotational dynamics of a wide range of molecular systems.
The material absorbs on average more than 99 percent of the ultraviolet, visible, infrared, and far-infrared light that hits it, said John Hagopian, the NASA engineer leading the effort.
Far-infrared radiant heat distribution is also silent and will not cause convection or air movement.
Herschel is able to look at far-infrared light, which is emitted not by stars, but by the gas and dust from which they form.