Fanconi

Fan·co·ni

(fahn-kō'nē),
Guido, Swiss pediatrician, 1892-1979. See: Fanconi anemia, Fanconi pancytopenia, Fanconi syndrome.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fernandes et al., "Improvement of genetic stability in lymphocytes from Fanconi anemia patients through the combined effect of [alpha]-lipoic acid and N- acetylcysteine," Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, vol.
Scientists report in the current issue of STEM CELLS Translational Medicine that they have been able to clone a line of defective stem cells behind a rare but devastating disease called Fanconi Anemia (FA).
Most common form is the infantile or nephropathy type form and is characterized by Fanconi syndrome with growth retardation, renal rickets, hypokalemia, polyuria, hypothyroidism and progressive renal failure.
Fanconi anemia: Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare genetic disease characterized with progressive bone marrow failure and predisposition to malignancy (especially AML) accompanied by various physical anomalies.
In the year 1989, the first umbilical cord blood transplant (UCBT ) was performed to treat a child with Fanconi's anaemia.2 Since then, UCBT has cured children with haematological malignancies, solid tumors and bone marrow failure syndromes.Its role in the paediatric population has been well established in several reports.3,4 In adults, several retrospective studies have shown comparable survival to traditional stem cell sources.
Besides thalassaemia, aplastic anaemia and fanconi anaemia are two other common diseases found in the area which are treated by bone marrow transplant, he said.
Contributors of sixteen essays disclose their experiences with genetic disabilities such as Huntington's disease, Alzheimer's disease, cancer, genetic deafness or blindness, schizophrenia, cystic fibrosis, Tay-Sachs Disease, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, fragile-X syndrome, and Fanconi's anemia.
Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare chromosome instability syndrome that predisposes to bone marrow failure, developmental abnormalities, and a high risk for the development of cancer, such as hematological malignancies, solid tumors of the head and neck region, and gynecological tumors (2-5).
Fanconi anaemia (FA) is characterised by interstrand crosslink-induced chromosome breaks, [1] congenital abnormalities (including radial-ray aplasia, heart and kidney malformations), [2] bone marrow failure, [3] and predisposition to haematological and solid malignancies.
Fanconi anaemia is an important diagnosis to exclude by relevant testing.
While Dungannon man Gavin Shiels geared up to run for charity Fanconi Hope.
He has Fanconi anemia, a rare disease that often leads to cancer.