family

(redirected from Family size)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia.

family

 [fam´ĭ-le]
1. a group of people related by blood or marriage or a strong common bond, such as those descended from a common ancestor, or a husband, wife, and their children.
2. a taxonomic category below an order and above a genus.
blended family a family unit composed of a married couple and their offspring including some from previous marriages.
dysfunctional family one in which adult caregivers are unable to consistently fulfill their family responsibilities.
extended family a nuclear family and their close relatives, such as the children's grandparents, aunts, and uncles.
nuclear family a family consisting of a two-generation relationship of parents and children, living together and more or less isolated from their extended family.
nuclear dyad family a husband and wife with no children.
family of origin the family in which a person grew up.
family processes the psychosocial, physiological, and spiritual functions and relationships within the family unit; for nursing diagnoses, see under process.
single-parent family a lone parent and offspring living together as a family unit.
skewed family a family in which one spouse is severely dysfunctional and the other spouse assumes an acquiescent, peacemaking stance to maintain equilibrium.
family (omaha) in the omaha system, a problem modifier defined as a social unit or related group of individuals who live together and who experience a health-related problem.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

fam·i·ly

(fam'ĭ-lē),
1. A group of two or more people united by blood, adoptive, or marital ties, or the common law equivalent.
2. In biologic classification, a taxonomic grouping at the level intermediate between the order and the tribe or genus.
3. A group of substances closely related structurally.
4. A group of proteins with characteristic sequence, pharmacologic, and/or signaling profiles.
[L. familia]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

family

(făm′ə-lē, făm′lē)
n. pl. fami·lies
1.
a. A fundamental social group in society typically consisting of one or two parents and their children.
b. The children of one of these groups: She raised a large family.
c. A group of persons related by descent or marriage: My whole family, including my cousins, gets together once a year. See Usage Note at collective noun.
2. People in the same line of descent; lineage: comes from an old Virginia family.
3. Obsolete All the members of a household living under one roof.
4. A locally independent organized crime unit, as of the Cosa Nostra.
5.
a. A group of like things; a class: the family of brass instruments.
b. A group of individuals derived from a common stock: the family of human beings.
6. Biology A taxonomic category of related organisms ranking below an order and above a genus. A family usually consists of several genera.
7. Linguistics A group of languages descended from the same parent language, such as the Indo-European language family.
8. Mathematics A set of functions or surfaces that can be generated by varying the parameters of a general equation.
9. Chemistry
a. A group of elements with similar chemical properties.
b. A vertical column in the periodic table of elements.
10. Physics Any of the three generations of elementary fermions.
adj.
1. Of or having to do with a family: family problems.
2. Being suitable for a family: family movies.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
Scispeak A group of related organisms, proteins, or chemicals
Taxonomy A category in the biological nomenclature of livings things which falls between an order and above a genus
Vox populi A unit of related individuals
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

family

1. A group of related organisms, proteins, or chemicals. See Superfamily.
2. A unit of related individuals. See Cancer family, Dysfunctional family, Extended family, Hernandez family, Immediate family, Jukes family, Multiproblem family, Nerve growth factor family, Nuclear family, Single-parent family Genetics A category in the biological nomenclature of livings things which falls between an order and above a genus.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

fam·i·ly

(fam'i-lē)
1. A group of two or more people linked by blood, adoptive, or marital ties, or the common-law equivalent.
2. In biologic classification, a taxonomic grouping at the level intermediate between the order and the tribe or genus.
3. A group of substances closely related structurally.
4. A group of proteins with characteristic sequence, pharmacologic, and/or signaling profiles.
[L. familia]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

family

the TAXON between ORDER and GENUS that normally contains more than one genus. Family names of animals usually end in -idae, and of plants in -ceae, for example, Ursidae, the bear family; Rosaceae, the rose family.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

fam·i·ly

(fam'i-lē)
1. Group of two or more people united by blood, adoptive, or marital ties, or the common law equivalent.
2. In biologic classification, taxonomic grouping at level intermediate between order and tribe or genus.
3. Substances closely related structurally.
[L. familia]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about family

Q. United happy family but now... We are a united happy family with married brothers, sisters and their families. Our father died when he was suffering from Bipolar1. Now one of my sisters is diagnosed as Bipolar II. We are afraid that our family happiness will vanish soon. Please let me know about the difference between bipolar1 and bipolar11 and what the treatments available are?

A. Hey pete,
Any family that is dealing with Bipolar disorder will have some difficult and trying times. you obviously love your sister so just be patient and supportive to her. Encourage her to take medications as perscribed and encourage her to get theropy, I think these steps are invaluable to a person with bipolar. Bipolar ii is less severe than bipolar 1. Bipolar ii is usually free of the hillucinations etc... However is still very serious and needs to be treated appropriately.
I hope your family stays strong through all your struggles, with the right support and theropy/meds and the love of her family your sister should do well in learning to manage the illness...

Q. Most of my family members are suffering from some disorder. Most of my family members are suffering from some disorder. I doubt it as bipolar. Is bipolar disorder a family problem?

Q. I AM WONDERING ABOUT GETTING HEALTH INSURANCE IS IT EXPENSIVE FOR A FAMILY?

A. Yes, it'll you cost you money, and not a negligible sum, but that's not necessarily means it'll be expensive - the alternative may eventually be much more expensive. We can never know what will happen tomorrow- if something will happen to you or your family (e.g. car accident, cancer or even relatively simple thing as appendicitis), the cost of the unavoidable medical treatment in this case will be much higher than the insurance premium.

Here (http://www.ahrq.gov/consumer/insuranceqa/) you can find an official governmental guide to choosing health insurance.

More discussions about family
This content is provided by iMedix and is subject to iMedix Terms. The Questions and Answers are not endorsed or recommended and are made available by patients, not doctors.
References in periodicals archive ?
Family size preference (FSP) was estimated as the mean ideal number of children which was based on responses to the question: "If you could go back to the time you did not have any children and could choose exactly the number of children to have in your whole life, how many would that be?" The last measure is contraceptive prevalence rate.
The relationship between regular physical activity and social support as operationalized by interpersonal factors including: (a) food security; (b) family size; and (c) health insurance was analyzed using hierarchical logistic regression.
Their mothers were interviewed for determinants of under nutrition under consideration i.e.; education, employment and family size. Education level was classified as educated or uneducated.
According to above illustration, the 5th conversed population (G5D) using decrement method (approach setting: population size = 500, sex ratio = 1: 1, family size = 10, number of overlapping = 5 (exclude the initial generation), number of loci = 100, each of locus initial frequency range from 0.2 to 0.9) was developed (composed of 5 population without initial generation), while G5L: the 5th conversed population using increment method, other steps similar to G5D.
But other researchers have pointed out that family size alone might not account for this pattern.
However, there was an association between the family size and age, education and type of family groups, which was statistically significant (p < 0.05).
Leia qualifies as Nancy's alternative family size dependent, but she does not qualify as Vince's alternative family size dependent, because she did not live with Vince long enough to qualify as his dependent.
In India, where women marry and start childbearing early, many have had 2-3 children-the current family size norm-by their early 20s.
She failed to see the contradiction in her position by comparing the family size in the 'poorer' countries with that in the more 'developed' countries.
Using only chickens that were raised humanely and never administered antibiotics, Applegate Natural Family Size Chicken Nug-gets contain only 180 calories, 9 grams of fat and 210 mg of sodium per serving.
This study explores whether morphological representations such as morphological family size are involved in the syllable frequency effect.