Fahr disease

Fahr dis·ease

(fahr), [MIM*213600]
progressive calcific deposition in the walls of blood vessels of the basal ganglia, in young to middle-aged people occasionally associated with mental retardation and extrapyramidal symptoms.

Fahr dis·ease

(fahr di-zēz')
Progressive calcific deposition in the walls of blood vessels of the basal ganglia, in young to middle-aged people; occasionally associated with mental retardation and extrapyramidal symptoms.

Fahr disease

Idiopathic basal ganglia calcification.

Fahr,

Theodore, German physician, 1877-1945.
Fahr disease - progressive calcific deposition in the walls of blood vessels of the basal ganglia, occasionally associated with mental retardation and extrapyramidal symptoms.
References in periodicals archive ?
Differential diagnoses for bilateral (sometimes unilateral) basal ganglia T1 hyperintensity include manganese toxicity in prolonged parenteral nutrition, chronic liver disease, hypoxicischemic changes, disorders of calcium metabolism such as hypo-or hyperparathyroidism, Fahr disease, neurofibromatosis, and Wilson disease (5).
Genetically, Fahr disease is known to have an autosomal dominant inheritance, and families with the disorder have been reported.1 No individuals with similar neuropsychiatric symptoms or who had been diagnosed with Fahr Syndrome were encountered in the family history of our patient.
Fahr disease progression with atypical symptoms: Presentation of two cases.
Other metabolic or toxic disorders showing T1 signhttps://static-hw.xvideos.com/v3/img/player/icon-play.svgal increase include chronic hepatic encephalopathy, the most frequent, manganese toxicity during long-term parenteral nutrition, postcardiac arrest encephalopathy, hypoglycemic coma, hypothyroidism, neurofibromatosis, Fahr disease, Wilson disease, and carbon monoxide poisoning.
Thal, "Density of the brain, decline of the mind: an atypical case of Fahr disease," Archives of Neurology, vol.
Intracranial calcifications can also be seen in rare idiopathic disorders such as Fahr disease (bilateral striopallidodentate calcinosis, Figure 31).
Frequent causes include Sturge-Weber syndrome,8 tuberous sclerosis, Fahr disease,8 post chemoradiotherapy change, and metabolic disorders secondary to parathyroid or thyroid gland abnormalities.