beech

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beech

a forest tree of the genus Fagus with glossy oval leaves, thin, smooth, greyish bark and fine-grained wood.
References in periodicals archive ?
Spatial distribution and development of root sprouts in Fagus grandifolia (Fagaceae).
As mentioned, Fagus grandifolia is the only species of beech that grows naturally in this country.
The important species in Wier Woods include loblolly pine (Pinus taeda), water oak (Quercus nigra), American beech (Fagus grandifolia), southern magnolia (Magnolia grandiflora), and white oak (Quercus alba) (Harcombe et.
Distribution and origin of American beech (Fagus grandifolia) regeneration is being studied as part of the Michigan Beech Bark Disease Monitoring and Impact Analysis System.
Gum trees Fagus grandifolia American beech Fraxinus americana White ash F.
American Beech (Fagus grandifolia) - A significant component of the northern hardwood forests, the beech tree has extremely smooth, gray bark, and leaves with small teeth that turn inward.
Stakes of yellow-poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera L.) and American beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.) were treated with CCA-C, creosote, and a creosote-borate dual treatment.
Among the trees of eastern North America, Sassafras albidum and Populus tremuloides produce both types of buds, whereas Fagus grandifolia produces only reparat ive buds and Liquidambar styraciflua only additional buds (Bosela & Ewers, 1997; Kormanic & Brown, 1967).
In the deciduous forests of North America, pin oak (Quercus palustris) and American beech (Fagus grandifolia) retain their leaves (Brockman 1979).
(1996), for instance, point to the abundance of the late-successional species Tsuga canadensis and Fagus grandifolia in old-growth stands as support for the results of SORTIE, a stand simulation model that predicts dominance of these taxa after hundreds of years of uninterrupted succession.
Later successional, disturbance-sensitive species, such as maple (Acer spp.) and beech (Fagus grandifolia), make up a very low percentage of the total (1.3% of total), while fire-adapted oaks and hickories and early successional species such as poplar (tulip poplar) and black walnut were more frequent.
2012; Yatskievych 2013) and is an obligate parasite interacting solely with the roots of Fagus grandifolia Ehrh.