Faecalibacterium

Faecalibacterium

(fē″kă-lē-bak″tēr′ē-ŭm) [L. faex, sediment, dregs + bacterium]
A genus of gram-negative rod-shaped commensal bacteria that live in the gastrointestinal tract.
References in periodicals archive ?
Walnut consumption resulted in higher relative abundance of three bacteria of interest: Faecalibacterium, Roseburia, and Clostridium.
Bacteroidetes, Ruminococcus gnavus, and Fusobacterium were increased in patients with GAD compared with controls, while Faecalibacterium, Eubacterium rectale, Sutterella, Lachnospira, and Butyricicoccus were increased in healthy controls.
In Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and remission from healthy individuals, populations of fecal bacteria changed (48).
They also showed a decreased proportion of Faecalibacterium, a genus with anti-inflammatory activity; this finding has been observed in patients with Crohn's disease.
In animal and human studies that looked at the correlation between microbiome and obesity, it was found that obese individuals had a low microbial diversity, a high percentage of Firmicute and Actinobacteria, and a low percentage of Bacteriodes, Verrucomicrobia and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii.
Walnut consumption resulted in a higher relative abundance of three bacteria of interest: Faecalibacterium, Roseburia, and Clostridium.
rectale Forward GCGGTRCGGCAAGTCTGA Reverse CCTCCGACACTCTAGTMCGAC Faecalibacterium prausnitzii Forward GGAGGAAGAAGGTCTTCGG Reverse AATTCCGCCTACCTCTGCACT Cluster IV Ruminococcus spp.
Faecalibacterium prausnitzii increase after RYGB in rats and correlate with a reduction in inflammatory markers (C-reactive protein and interleukin 6) (19).
Watterlot et al., "Faecalibacterium prausnitzii is an anti-inflammatory commensal bacterium identified by gut microbiota analysis of Crohn disease patients," Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol.
Reiffet al., "Microbiota of de-novo pediatric IBD: increased Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and reduced bacterial diversity in Crohn's but not in ulcerative colitis," American Journal of Gastroenterology, vol.
Examples of bacterial taxa that have been associated with health and effective gastrointestinal function include Bacteroides, Bifidobacterium, Eubacterium, Faecalibacterium, Lactobacillus, and Roseburia [15].