factory farming

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factory farming

a farming system in which industrial procedures are utilized, e.g. animals in crates moving past a fixed feeding point at prearranged intervals, battery accommodation, debeaking, single animal accommodation with no physical contact between animals.
References in periodicals archive ?
What does not make sense, and what seems very odd, is our lack of compassion for factory farm animals in stalls or feedlots.
19) Shifting American values such as efficiency and productivity as well as technological advances sparked the beginnings of modern factory farms.
If the DGAC had really told us the truth about America's red-meat horror show (95 percent of our red meat comes from these Confined Animal Feeding Operations or CAFOs), we'd be having a conversation about how we can get rid of factory farms.
Factory farms and their kill floors are akin to fortresses, no entry for outsiders.
A sampling peek at factory farms should make the Danish Minister and John Blackwell, the incoming President of British Veterinary Association, recently stated 'killing animals by letting them bleed to death after slitting their throats causes unnecessary suffering,' revisit their thoughts, approach and words on 'animal rights' at home before make statements on religious slaughter.
The very air in these factory farms is an assault to the senses.
The sheds housing such factory farms will now grow in number and the smells and pollution will taint our sea and beaches.
I did some research to find out how factory farms treat animals.
Dirty, crowded conditions on factory farms can propagate sickness and disease among the animals, including swine influenza (H1N1), avian influenza (H5N1), foot-and-mouth disease, and mad-cow disease (bovine spongiform encephalopathy).
Our findings indicate that citizens near factory farms may be breathing unsafe levels of small particle pollution, ammonia and other toxic gases and that EPA's failure to regulate air pollution from these operations may threaten public health.
Known to governmental regulators as concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) and to the general public as factory farms, these entities are responsible for over 95% of the chicken, eggs, turkey, and pork consumed in the United States, and over 75 % of beef cattle.