facial angle


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fa·cial an·gle

1. any of several variously named and variously defined anatomic angles that have been used to quantify facial protrusion;
2. in dentistry, the angle formed by the intersection of the orbitomeatal (Frankfort) plane with the nasion-pogonion line (inner lower angle), which establishes the anteroposterior relation of the mandible to the upper face at the orbitomeatal plane. Synonym(s): Frankfort-mandibular incisor angle

fa·cial an·gle

(fāshăl anggĕl)
1. Any of several variously named and variously defined anatomic angles that have been used to quantify facial protrusion.
2. In dentistry, angle formed by intersection of orbitomeatal plane with nasion-pogonion line, which establishes anteroposterior relation of mandible to upper face at the orbitomeatal plane.
Synonym(s): Frankfurt-mandibular incisor angle.
References in periodicals archive ?
Leung et al., "Frontomaxillary facial angle at 11 + 0 to 13 + 6 weeks in Chinese population," Journal of Maternal-Fetal and Neonatal Medicine, vol.
Nicolaides, "Frontomaxillary facial angle in fetuses with trisomy 21 at 11-13(6) weeks," American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol.
McLennan, "Frontomaxillary facial angle measurement at 11-14 weeks, assessment of interobserver and intraobserver agreement in 2D and 3D imaging," Fetal Diagnosis and Therapy, vol.
Wang et al., "Learning curve in measurement of fetal frontomaxillary facial angle at 11-13 weeks of gestation," Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol.
Nicolaides, "Frontomaxillary facial angle in trisomy 21 fetuses at 16-24 weeks of gestation," Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol.
Nicolaides, "Frontomaxillary facial angle at 11 + 0 to 13 + 6 weeks: effect of plane of acquisition," Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol.
Namara) Saddle-nasion and Plane palatal SN-PP angle Frankfort angle-palatal plane FH-PP SNB angle SN-N B (Riedel) Facial angle FH-N Pog (Downs) Pogonion point to perpendicular (Mc.
Clearly this seems to contradict somewhat earlier theories from the eighteenth century that had proclaimed that biologically, in terms of the pelvis, cranial size and facial angle, and psychologically, in terms of emotional disposition and mental capacity, black men and white women were quite similar.
Henceforth, anti-abolitionists resorted, for example, to physiognomy and phrenology and eighteenth-century biological arguments about cranial size and facial angles to argue for inherent black inferiority.
Facial angle (degree)###male###78###92.6154###2.28621###.25886
Facial angle (degree)###1.276###148###.204###.49038###.38430###-.26903###1.24980
In northern Mexican population the Holdaway soft tissue facial angle was significantly greater in 13-year-old boys than in girls, indicating a more convex soft tissue profile.22 However, in the present study, no statistically significant gender differences were found for soft tissue facial angle for Peshawar population.