FOXP2

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FOXP2

A gene on chromosome 7q31 that encodes a member of the forkhead/winged-helix family of transcription factors, which is expressed in foetal and adult brain, lung and gut. It is evolutionarily conserved, and binds hundreds of different gene promoters to regulate the expression of their cognate genes. FOXP2 is required for proper development of speech and language areas of the brain during embryogenesis, and is involved in pathways that influence language development.

Molecular pathology
FOXP2 mutations cause speech-language disorder type 1 (autosomal dominant speech and language disorder with orofacial dyspraxia).
References in periodicals archive ?
The gene was first identified in a group of family members who had severe difficulties in speaking and understanding speech, and who were found to carry a mutated version of the Foxp2 gene.
A Recent Evolutionary Change Affects a Regulatory Element in the Human FOXP2 Gene," Molecular Biology and Evolution 30, no.
Mutations in the FOXP2 gene have been linked to speech and language deficits and in autism disorders.
Also, genetic analyses had already shown that the FOXP2 gene, which is tied to vocal learning in birds and humans, is also strongly selected in bats.
2008), "The Timing of Selection at the Human FOXP2 Gene," Molecular Biology and Evolution 25: 1257-1259.
2010: 113), "Up to date behavioural and anatomical studies of Neandertal fossils and the recent discovery of their possession of the FOXP2 gene indicate Neandertals (and, very likely, their European ancestors) had linguistic capacities similar to living humans" (una posicion muy similar es expresada tambien en Frayer et al.
The story of the FOXP2 gene may explain how we made the neurological "jump" that explains our uniqueness.
These enterprising scientists have genetically altered their lab mice to possess the human version of the FOXP2 gene, one of the main controllers of verbal communication.
And our very special FOXP2 gene probably facilitates language in some significant way as well.
But humans and Neandertals did share a version of the FOXP2 gene associated with speech in humans.
The FOXP2 gene is remarkably similar overall between singing mice, lab mice and humans, said Phelps.
During the new study, researchers introduced those substitutions into the FOXP2 gene of mice.