Family and Medical Leave Act

(redirected from FMLA)
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Family and Medical Leave Act

,

FMLA

A federal law, enacted in 1993, that requires large employers to grant up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave during any 12-month period to long-standing employees for compelling medical or family reasons. Reasons include care of spouse, child, or parent of employee who has a serious health problem; birth of child of employee and care of the child; adoption or foster care-placement of a child with employee; and serious employee health problems that do not allow person to perform essential functions of job position.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Reeber, counsel for Admiral Packaging, also emphasized the temporal aspects of the case, where 11 months elapsed between the FMLA leave and the plaintiff's termination.
Although the record was unclear as to exactly when supervisor Robert Hummel made the alleged comments, from Reeber's perspective they were tenuous and too far removed from the FMLA leave.
"Eichenholz received multiple extensions of his leave, and the entire period of time was treated as FMLA leave, for which he was fully paid.
Department of Labor can be used for either OFLA or FMLA absences and include everything an employer can ask and nothing it cannot.
Snipes' argument that the jail authority interfered with his FMLA rights when it terminated him fails to allege facts sufficient to state a claim for relief.
Q: Can an EA professional certify an employee's need for FMLA?
* Avoiding retaliation claims when terminating after FMLA leave.
(3) Prior to their departure, she submitted a request for leave under the Family and Medical Leave Act ("FMLA"), which the Park District formally denied.
Congress enacted the FMLA in 1993 to help working Americans "balance the demands of the workplace with the needs of families." (16) Recognizing the need for federal intervention into employer practices, (17) the FMLA created the first set of federal statutes that required many employers to provide leave for employees to address family and medical needs outside the workplace.
It should be noted that the employer is responsible for paying for the third and second opinions, and the employee is provisionally entitled to FMLA leave while submitting to the second and third opinions.
Understanding what makes the FMLA successful is of current import because there are many proposed and recently-enacted laws, which, like the FMLA, provide leave benefits to workers.