FHR


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FHR

Abbreviation for fetal heart rate.

FHR

Fetal heart rate, see there.

FHR

Abbreviation for fetal heart rate.

rate

(rat) [L. rata, calculated]
The speed or frequency of occurrence of an event, usually expressed with respect to time or some other known standard.

acquisition rate

In radiology, the speed with which medical images are recorded, usually expressed in images per second.

attack rate

The rate of occurrence of new cases of a disease.

basal metabolic rate

Abbreviation: BMR
The metabolic rate as measured 12 hr after eating, after a restful sleep, with no exercise or activity preceding testing, with elimination of emotional excitement, and at a comfortable temperature. It is usually expressed in terms of kilocalories per square meter of body surface per hour. It increases, for example, in hyperthyroidism. Synonym: resting energy expenditure

baseline fetal heart rate

Abbreviation: FHR
The average range of beats per minute recorded within a 10-min time frame. The normal range is between 120 and 160 beats per minute.

birth rate

The number of live births per 1000 in the population in a given year.

case rate

Morbidity rate.

case fatality rate

The percentage of individuals afflicted with an illness who die as a result of it.

concordance rate

The frequency with which a gene will be inherited or expressed by identical or fraternal twins.

death rate

The number of deaths in a specified population, usually expressed per 100,000 population over a given period, usually 1 year. Synonym: death-to-case ratio; mortality rate

delivery rate

In assisted reproduction technology, the number of newborn deliveries achieved in every one hundred follicular aspirations, embryo transfers, or stimulated cycles.

dose rate

The quantity of medicine or radiation administered per unit of time.

erythrocyte sedimentation rate

Abbreviation: ESR
See: sedimentation rate

false-negative rate

The rate of occurrence of negative test results in those who have the attribute or disease for which they are being tested.

false-positive rate

The rate of occurrence of positive test results in those who do not have the attribute or disease for which they are being tested.

fertility rate

The number of births per year per 1000 women between ages 15 and 44 in a given population.

fetal mortality rate

The number of fetal deaths per 1000 live births, usually per year.

growth rate

The rate at which an individual, tissue, or organ grows over time.

heart rate

Abbreviation: HR
The number of heartbeats per unit of time, usually expressed or written as number per minute. A normal resting heart rate for an adult is 60–100 beats per minute.

infant mortality rate

The number of deaths per year of live-born infants less than 1 year of age divided by the number of live births in the same year. This value is usually expressed as deaths per 100,000 live births.
See: neonatal mortality rate; perinatal mortality rate

infusion rate

The speed of administration of a solution in mL/hr.

CAUTION!

It is calculated by the following formula: Rate = (Dose × 60 × Body weight)/Concentration, in which the dose is in mcg/kg/min; 60 is in min/hr; weight is in kg; and the concentration of the substance in solution is in mcg/mL.
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CAUSES OF MATERNAL DEATH

maternal mortality rate

The number of maternal deaths in 1 year from puerperal causes (such as those associated with pregnancy, childbirth, and the puerperium) within 42 days after delivery divided by the number of live births in that same year. This value is usually expressed as deaths per 100,000 live births. See: illustration

maximum midexpiratory flow rate

Abbreviation: MMFR
The average airflow during the middle half of a forced vital capacity effort.

metabolic rate

The rate of utilization of energy. This is usually measured at a time when the subject is completely at rest and in a fasting state. Energy used is calculated from the amount of oxygen used during the test.
See: basal metabolic rate; basal metabolism

morbidity rate

The number of cases per year of certain diseases in relation to the size of the population in which they occur. Synonym: case rate

mortality rate

Death rate.

neonatal mortality rate

The number of deaths in 1 year of infants aged 0 to 28 days divided by the number of live births in that same year.
See: maternal mortality rate; perinatal mortality rate

peak expiratory flow rate

The maximum rate of exhalation during a forced expiration, measured in liters per second or liters per minute. It is used as a test of airway obstruction.

perinatal mortality rate

The number of stillbirths (in which the gestation period was 28 weeks or more) in the first 7 days of life divided by the number of live births plus stillbirths in the same year. This value is usually expressed as deaths per 100,000 live births plus stillbirths.
See: infant mortality rate; neonatal mortality rate

periodontal disease rate

See: periodontal (Ramfjord) index

pulse rate

The number of heartbeats per unit of time that can be detected by palpating any accessible artery.

respiration rate

The number of breaths per unit of time.

sedimentation rate

Abbreviation: ESR (erythrocyte sedimentation rate)
A nonspecific laboratory test used as a marker of inflammation. In this test the speed at which erythrocytes settle out of unclotted blood is measured. Blood to which an anticoagulant has been added is placed in a long, narrow tube, and the distance the red cells fall in 1 hr is the ESR. Normally it is less than 10 mm/hr in men and slightly higher in women.

The speed at which the cells settle depends on how many red blood cells clump together. Clumping is increased by the presence of acute-phase proteins released during inflammation.

specific absorption rate

The rate at which electromagnetic energy is absorbed by a kilogram of tissue, usually expressed as the heat absorbed by the tissue, or as the power absorbed per unit of mass.

ventilation rate

Abbreviation: VR
The number of breaths per minute.

baseline fetal heart rate

Abbreviation: FHR
The average range of beats per minute recorded within a 10-min time frame. The normal range is between 120 and 160 beats per minute.
See also: rate
References in periodicals archive ?
As is the case with variable recurrent decelerations, the presence of accelerations or moderate FHR variability, or both, provides reassurance that the baby is doing well at that point.
The baseline signal [f.sub.BL] is obtained by low-pass filtering the FHR and computing a linear trend over the data window.
In general as shown in Figure 4, the FHR results follow trends that one would expect.
If reactivity is questionable or there are unusual or worrisome FHR patterns, monitoring may be continued up to 90 minutes.
"Our affiliation with FHR expands the footprint of our rapidly growing behavioral health division while presenting new network opportunities to leverage Elwyn's educational, residential, and employment services.
DEFENDANTS' DEFENSE: The nurses continuously monitored by listening to sounds coming out of the bedside monitor even though no taping of FHR was occurring on the central monitors or FHR monitor strip.
Several authors have evaluated the relationship of slow FHR in early pregnancy and pregnancy outcome.
(12) Other researchers have found a significant reduction in the FHR in women who had received intramuscular diamorphine for pain relief.
In 2008, the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) partnered with the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) and the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine (SMFM) to sponsor a workshop focused on electronic FHR monitoring.
PARENTS' CLAIM: Even though non-reassuring FHR monitoring findings occurred, the physicians did not offer cesarean delivery (CD).
Grace Cabral, FHR Integrated Marketing and Communications Manager
FHR and FHR reactivity represent the most sensitive indicators of fetal well-being.