Fc

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Fc frag·ment

the crystallizable fragment of an immunoglobulin molecule composed of the constant regions of the heavy chains and responsible for binding to antibody receptors (Fc receptor) on cells and the Clq component of complement.
Synonym(s): Fc piece

Fc frag·ment

, Fc (frag'mĕnt)
The crystallizable fragment of an immunoglobulin molecule composed of part of the heavy chains and responsible for binding to antibody receptors on cells and the Clq component of complement.

Fc

A crystallizable, non-antigen-binding fragment of an antibody molecule obtained by brief digestion with the enzyme papain. It consists of the C-terminal part of both heavy chains, the part which binds to FC RECEPTORS.
References in periodicals archive ?
This role change has been a source of frustration for government PMs who feel they do not have a voice in managing their programs, especially at the middle and lower tiers of the FCS program (Source #4, 2005).
Others cited that the contractual relationship with the LSI had created an adversarial atmosphere on the FCS program, instead of the cooperative atmosphere which was intended.
Discussions with government organizations and industry subcontractors participating in the FCS program have painted a culture of mistrust between themselves and the LSI personnel.
There remains ill will among some of the subcontractors who were part of industry teams that competed for the LSI role in the FCS program and were not selected.
For example, the LSI should be able to pull together the collective lobbying power of their large partners and leverage it to gain additional support for the FCS program in the Congress.
Developing a strategy to implement a program of the magnitude of the FCS is absolutely essential for success.
With a program as large as the FCS, government agencies supporting the program would clearly be engaged throughout all levels of their organizations.
Another shortcoming that has coincided with the lack of an adequate organizational structure on the government side of the FCS program has been the lack of sufficient communication channels.
Given the vital importance of FCS to the Army's current and future capabilities, Harvey said, "it is critical that we keep the FCS program intact, and that it is not fragmented with the associated changes in funding."
Reductions in FCS funding could jeopardize the Army's combat capabilities, he said.
"Modernizing without the complete FCS program complicates management, could sacrifice capabilities, decreases integration, and increases costs," Harvey said.
Schoomaker added that a restructuring of FCS last year reduced the program's cost from $34 billion to $25 billion, and that over the past several years the Army has terminated some 120 other programs to free up funding for FCS and help move the current force into brigade-based modular units.